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The New Mister Pirate: Brenan Holston Has Big Plans for His Title

Morgan Harris | Staff Writer Brenan Holston, a Hampton University graduating senior International Studies major from Atlanta, was crowned the 20th Mister Pirate on Oct. 1, during the Mister Pirate pageant. He competed against four other contestants for the 2021-2022 title.  Holston is truly the jack-of-all-trades as a college student, and his primary goal is…

A Midseason Look at Hampton Football 

Chance Williams | Staff Writer The Hampton University football team has seen it all through their first five games of the 2021 season.  The Pirates have two wins against Virginia Union and Howard … and three losses against Old Dominion, Norfolk State and Kennesaw State. A big reason for those wins is the team’s high-powered offense.…


Campus

  • The New Mister Pirate: Brenan Holston Has Big Plans for His Title
    Morgan Harris | Staff Writer Brenan Holston, a Hampton University graduating senior International Studies major from Atlanta, was crowned the 20th Mister Pirate on Oct. 1, during the Mister Pirate pageant. He competed against four other contestants for the 2021-2022 title.  Holston is truly the jack-of-all-trades as a college student, and his primary goal is…
  • The 87th Annual Fall Convocation Marks the End of an Era for Many
    Raven Harper| Staff Editor The last time Ciara White-Sparks was on campus as a student, she was a sophomore. This past Sunday, the seniors, known as Quintessence Eleven, lined up to walk in their caps and gowns at opening convocation, a sacred tradition for each year’s graduating senior class. “Being at the opening convocation is…
  • Freshman class candidates go head-to-head in elections debate
    Sasha Thornton | Staff Writer Quintessence 12 has newly elected officers after contentious freshman debates, with students electing Carlyle Fulton and Kennedy Ashford, respectively, for freshman class president and vice president. First-year students campaigned for the positions and were able to debate against each other in the student center September 20. Hampton students, many of them…

Local and World

Opinion

  • Should the COVID Vaccine be Mandated?
    Sydney McCall | Staff Writer While vaccine mandates continue to be a national debate, signs show that current vaccine mandates are working.  COVID-19 has affected more than 44 million people in the U.S. and taken more than 700,000 lives, according to official Center for Disease Control and Prevention data. When the Coronavirus first appeared in…
  • Reset and Run it Back
    Alfred Johnson | Staff Writer Hampton University’s Homecoming is one of the most long-awaited events on campus. Still, after the world’s continuing battle with COVID-19, changes are being made, and it’s making students raise a brow as to what’s happening.  The reason is that people were expecting Homecoming to occur a little later in the…
  • I Don’t Like Guys That Want Girls That Want Girls
    Grace Elizabeth Hackney | Staff Writer With the recent release of Drake’s tenth studio album, Certified Lover Boy, Drake has taken over the Billboard Hot 100 chart with nine of his songs in the top 10. There’s one song that got my attention, the song that holds No. 2 spot on the Billboard Hot 100…

Lifestyle

  • Five Tips for Students Adjusting Back To Campus
    Noah Hogan | Staff Writer  Since March 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic has changed daily life as we know it.  During our confinement, the pandemic left us with many questions. The one big one was: What would a full-scale, on-campus operation look like? As students have returned roughly 18 months after Hampton University initially closed its…
  • Hampton University Traditions
     Nia White | Staff Writer Hampton University has had many traditions in the past 153 years. Some of these traditions have stayed the same and others have evolved to fit current society. Some of the traditions for freshmen have changed since 1966, with the requirements for men and women being different.   One of the…
  • Voices of Black Literature: Margaret Daramola
    Mia Concepcion | Staff Writer Black literature keeps Black thought alive. It conveys the experiences that Africans and African-Americans have undergone from the past until now. Their words, taking multiple forms in books, poetry, and songs, tell stories that will live on forever and never be forgotten. Although threatened when they raised their voices, the…

Arts and Entertainment

  • Zendaya and Timothèe Chalamet speak to the continual relevance of Dune
     Jontaya Moore | Staff Writer The newest adaptation of Dune has been highly anticipated by fans worldwide. Dune is an epic science film that depicts the chaos of outer dimensional forces. Amid these forces, characters are brought together in hopes of saving their humanity and family lineages.  In a Warner Bros. college roundtable, 30 college…
  • Chadwick Boseman: His Legacy Lives
    Trinity Goppy | Staff Writer In honor of late Howard University alumnus Chadwick Boseman, the school and Netflix have created a $5.4 million scholarship called The Chadwick A. Boseman Memorial Scholarship. Ted Sarandos, Netflix’s co-CEO and chief content officer, announced the partnership in a news release.  “He always spoke of his time at Howard and…
  • HU Students Offer a TV Guide Through Shows New and Old
     Nia Cain | Staff Writer Premieres of TV shows can be the highlight of some people’s summer experiences. New shows such as “Generation” and “Clickbait” and returning shows such as “Outer Banks” were the biggest hits of the summer.  “‘Outer Banks’ is my favorite show because regardless of how much I binge the show, I…

Sports

  • As NBA Season Begins, Vaccination Issue Looms in New York and San Francisco
    Wynton Jackson | Staff Writer Despite having the first in-person NBA Media Day since 2019, not all teams felt the cheer and optimism the event normally brings. This year, the usual superstar gossip was headlined by Ben Simmons’ refusal to return to the 76ers – but there was also a more severe issue: COVID-19 vaccination. …
  • A Midseason Look at Hampton Football 
    Chance Williams | Staff Writer The Hampton University football team has seen it all through their first five games of the 2021 season.  The Pirates have two wins against Virginia Union and Howard … and three losses against Old Dominion, Norfolk State and Kennesaw State. A big reason for those wins is the team’s high-powered offense.…
  • The ManningCast: ESPN’s rebound 
    Wynton Jackson | Staff Writer ESPN on Sept. 13 stumbled on its most popular program since First Take: The Peyton and Eli Monday night NFL broadcast, ManningCast. The sports media conglomerate signed a deal with the NFL to air Monday night games on their networks, then brought in the Manning brothers to commentate about 10…

Zendaya and Timothèe Chalamet speak to the continual relevance of Dune

 Jontaya Moore | Staff Writer

The newest adaptation of Dune has been highly anticipated by fans worldwide. Dune is an epic science film that depicts the chaos of outer dimensional forces. Amid these forces, characters are brought together in hopes of saving their humanity and family lineages. 

In a Warner Bros. college roundtable, 30 college students were selected to interview actors Zendaya and Timothée Chalamet about their roles in the upcoming release of Dune. The interviewers were chosen from their university’s largest major newspaper or media outlet. 

Students were able to see a private screening of the film in order to form film-centric questions. A Zoom was held following the movie presentation, allowing several students to ask specific questions, while all received feedback and journalistic experience. 

Director Denis Villeneuve was driven to recreate the award-winning sci-fi novel after his childhood encounter with the book and the continuing impact it left on his life, according to New York Times Magazine.

“Being that he read it as a young person and was able to grow with it and grow up with it quite literally and has been a fan of it for so long, I think, that is a greater emotional connection to the piece that he’s creating,” Zendaya said. 

Due to the stature that Dune has upheld for decades, numerous directors and critics have withheld from taking on the task of creating a movie since the 1984 version, but the actress believes Villeneuve was the right choice. 

“I don’t think there’s anyone better for the job,” she said.

When it came to Zendaya and Chalamet confirming their positions in the movie, both agreed that it was an undeniable offer. From the director to the notable cast they would get to work alongside, they told the Zoom panelist that it was a dream come true. 

The story of Dune encompases Paul Atreides, a young aristocrat, born into great family lineage. Paul and his family agree to voyage to the most dangerous planet in the galaxy with hopes of securing their future. 

Like the average teen, Paul found himself battling with his identity and the expectations that come with being a part of the house of Atreides. 

“I think those are things that all of us struggle with when we’re that age,” Chalamet said. “Sometimes, like Paul, there’s an ulterior circumstance, something greater than yourself, that pulls you out of that safe setting, that forces you to grow maybe sooner than you were ready to.” 

Throughout the movie, the audience will be able to relate to not only Paul but also other characters as well. The two spoke strongly of their appreciation of their character roles. When asked, the actors stated that they could both connect with Chani, Zendaya’s character, or Paul on a deeper level. 

Villeneueve wanted to keep the film as grounded in reality as possible, according to The New York Times. However, the location of where Dune was filmed made it almost impossible for actors not to feel dreamlike at times. 

In the interview, Zendaya emphasized the director’s ability to never lose sight of the human element and emotion even amid an outer dimension setting. Chalamet said he only filmed two scenes with one green screen in the background. 

“It felt like a constant process of being inspired by everything that was happening around,” he said.

While Zendaya was not on set as long as the rest of the cast, she also shared these “special moments.” She emphasized her gratitude for those moments and spoke to her immersion into her role as Chani. 

Continuing through the journey of Arrakis, Paul and Chani play a major role in the maturing of each other’s characters. Both actors explained that on and off camera their friendship is strong, which helps when it comes to filming certain scenes. 

When asked about what’s to come for Dune and its characters, Chalamet and Zendaya were unable to confirm a sequel for the movie but were hopeful for the opportunity. Both actors were sure of what Dune meant to them and the message they expect it to give to the audience, specifically young adults. 

“The movie is about many things, but if young people can relate to what Chani or Paul are going through at the center of it and can also intake themes that sometimes go over my head, then we succeed,” Chalamet said. 

Dune is set to release on HBO Max on Friday, Oct. 21, and will be in theaters Saturday, Oct. 22.

As NBA Season Begins, Vaccination Issue Looms in New York and San Francisco

Wynton Jackson | Staff Writer

Despite having the first in-person NBA Media Day since 2019, not all teams felt the cheer and optimism the event normally brings.

This year, the usual superstar gossip was headlined by Ben Simmons’ refusal to return to the 76ers – but there was also a more severe issue: COVID-19 vaccination. 

Though there is no mandate, the league has a 95 percent vaccination rate, according to NBA.com. While the unvaccinated in most cities are still cleared to play, New York City and San Francisco passed laws stating that they cannot participate in home games. 

Two teams affected, the Golden State Warriors and the Brooklyn Nets, both had high-profile players resisting the shot. 

The NBA also said players would not be paid for games missed due to the vaccine. For unvaccinated players in Brooklyn or San Francisco, that would be 41 games without pay, plus any postseason appearances. 

Among the slew of players who announced their stance on Media Day, Golden State forward Andrew Wiggins surprised audiences. Wiggins, known for his carefree attitude, gave a no-nonsense news conference.

“I’m gonna keep that all private right now,” Wiggins told NBA media members about his vaccination status.

He proceeded to answer each question concerning the vaccine with a similar response. 

The forward’s calm demeanor may have thrown reporters off as they kept pressing him about the shot. One journalist mentioned the potential monetary consequences he would suffer, to which Wiggins responded, “It’s my problem, not yours,” in a matter-of-fact tone that quieted the room. 

Oct. 5, before the Warriors’ first preseason game against the Portland Trail Blazers, Wiggins announced that he had received the COVID-19 vaccine. 

“The only options were to get vaccinated or not play in the NBA,” Wiggins told reporters after their 121-107 victory. 

Whereas Wiggins is rarely in the news, Nets superstar Kyrie Irving is no stranger to public scrutiny. Irving shook the NBA when he arrived late and on a Zoom call to Media Day. 

Irving refused to expand on his stance against the vaccine, citing privacy as the main reason. He confirmed that he had not taken the vaccine and was not allowed into the building. However, even with questions not directly tied to his vaccination status, he remained guarded.

When ESPN’s Malika Andrews asked if he expected to play in home games, Irving said: “Again, I would like to keep all of that private. Please, just respect my privacy.” 

Irving’s defiance could have devastating consequences for the Nets’ postseason aspirations. Without Irving, they would be limited to the big two: James Harden and Kevin Durant. Although they are both top 10 players in the league, losing Irving for home games will significantly lower their chances of winning the title. 

The annual general manager survey revealed that the Nets received 72 percent of the votes for winning the NBA Finals this year, followed by the Los Angeles Lakers at 17 percent, according to NBA.com. 

The media has come to expect stances like this from Irving. He pledged his loyalty to the Boston Celtics before demanding a trade. He recently tried to convince players not to enter the NBA Bubble in the wake of the George Floyd murder, even though he wasn’t playing. 

“I expect us to have our whole team, at some point,” Durant told NBA reporters in response to questions surrounding Irving’s status. However, if he refuses the vaccine, the Nets may be forced to trade him to another team.

That move would have to be approved by Durant, as the two friends joined Brooklyn together in the summer of 2019. 

Students around the Hampton University campus have mixed feelings about the situation. First-year student Donovin Cooper, an aspiring sports agent, believes athletes should be vaccinated but not forced to take it.

“The United States is built on freedom, and when you’re forcing somebody to do something, you are forcing them against their will,” Cooper said. “And you are holding their money hostage in the process.”

Avid basketball consumer and prospective sports journalist Raymond Beasley had this to say about vaccinations.

“I don’t think they should be forced, but assuming that everybody is vaccinated, then [docking pay] is appropriate,” Beasley said. “In order to play and not jeopardize a team, player, season, or game, you have to get vaccinated, although the decision is up to them.” 

From an athlete’s perspective, Hampton soccer player Ryan Lynch supported the NBA’s decision to pressure non-vaccinated performers.

“As an athlete, I think athletes should get vaccinated,” Lynch said. “It helps to protect themselves, and they are role models to many people. NBA players carry a lot of influence, so I believe they should get the vaccine so their followers can be encouraged to get it.”

When asked whether players need to take the vaccine even though they are not at significant risk of death, Lynch argued that “it’s better to be safe than sorry, no matter how healthy you are.” 

With cities considering following New York and San Francisco’s lead, the NBA may be without some of its premier talents for the October 19 tipoff.

A Midseason Look at Hampton Football 

Chance Williams | Staff Writer

Photo Courtesy of HBCU Sports 

The Hampton University football team has seen it all through their first five games of the 2021 season. 

The Pirates have two wins against Virginia Union and Howard … and three losses against Old Dominion, Norfolk State and Kennesaw State.

A big reason for those wins is the team’s high-powered offense. As of Oct. 7, the Pirates are second in the Big South with 35.3 points per game, according to the conference website. That’s something that not only fans but also players hope will continue. 

“As an offensive unit, we’ve been averaging 35.3 points per game, and what’s good is that we can still improve on a lot of things,” HU quarterback Christofer Zellous said. “So we’re just continuing to try and get better every week, finding something we can get better at each day in practice.”

Pirates offensive lineman Zach Jean-Louis agreed.

“Our offense has been clicking. We’re putting up all these points each game. If we can keep that up, continue executing, and staying together, we’ll be in good shape.”

As of Oct. 7, the Pirates ranked fourth in the conference in passing yards per game at 248.8 and second in rushing yards per game at 217.3, according to the Big South.

An unknown aspect of this football season is how quickly the team has come together. “We’re starting to learn from each other,” Zellous said. “Coming off a short offseason and having about 10 weeks to get ready for this season, I think we’re doing a great job of playing together. It’s big-time what we’ve been able to do and create here.”

Athletes often speak about how behind-the-scenes bonds between players are vital in building and sustaining teammate chemistry that leads to wins. At Hampton, players are firm believers in that. 

“I want to see us continue to uplift each other when things are both good and bad,” HU defensive back Robinson Davis said. “Just keeping our brothers’ heads up, because not everything is going to be perfect. If we continue to do that, I feel that we’ll be all right.”

Several other players, including wide receivers Armand Vinson and Brycen Thomas, and quarterback Jayden Birchfield, echoed Davis’ comments.

The crowds are a seemingly underrated aspect of football games to those who attend contests at HU’s Armstrong Stadium. Noise created by crowds is a significant help to those playing on the defensive side of the ball, and the Pirates are aware of this. 

“During third-down situations, making some noise really throws the offense off,” Davis said. “As a collective defense, we’d appreciate more fans coming out and making noise to help us get off the field, so we can get our offense back on the field to make some more plays.” 

HU defensive back Stanley Garner reiterated that.

“When we’re on defense, we want all the fans to get loud so the opposing team doesn’t hear their cadence,” Garner said. “It’s helpful towards us defensive players as well.” 

Even with the typical ups and downs of every sports season, the Pirates remain confident, with their heads held high. 

“Team morale is great,” Davis said. “We’re family. We preach it every day. It’s about trusting your brother next to you. We’re positive going forward, and we look forward to doing big things. While enduring the highs and lows of a season, it’s important to keep a good head on your shoulders.” 

The Pirates have been doing just that while looking to build consistency as they get more games under their belts. 

“It’s really all about executing,” HU receiver Romon Copeland Jr. said. “It’s about doing what’s best for the team and holding your brothers accountable.” 

The next home game will be against North Carolina A&T on Oct. 23. The entire Hampton University family welcomes any support for the team every time they lace up their cleats.

Should the COVID Vaccine be Mandated?

Sydney McCall | Staff Writer

While vaccine mandates continue to be a national debate, signs show that current vaccine mandates are working. 

COVID-19 has affected more than 44 million people in the U.S. and taken more than 700,000 lives, according to official Center for Disease Control and Prevention data. When the Coronavirus first appeared in March 2020, everyone wished for an easy solution to end it. Now that it is here, many people are skeptical, which is confusing. 

The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine is 95 percent effective against the coronavirus, according to the CDC. Additionally, if one does happen to catch the virus after being fully vaccinated, they are less likely to develop severe illness or death. So why do so many people have reservations?

Social media has spread much misinformation about the vaccine. Some say there is a microchip inside of it that allows the government to track its citizens. Others say the vaccine causes infertility. Some anti-vaxxers even claim that the vaccine can turn one into a zombie, as if that is physically possible. 

Vaccines are not a new concept. As an American citizen, one receives several vaccines throughout their childhood. Polio, hepatitis B, tetanus, and chickenpox are just some examples of life-threatening diseases that have practically been eliminated in our country because of vaccines. 

The COVID-19 vaccine saved more than 140,000 lives over the first five months of 2021, according to a study by Sumedha Gupta published by Health Affairs. In New York, vaccinations led to 11.7 fewer COVID deaths per 10,000 people, according to Healthline. 

The efficacy of the COVID vaccine can also be seen at Hampton University. The COVID numbers at HU are very low because 97 percent of faculty and 98 percent of students are vaccinated, according to a Sept. 15 letter from the university.

Some students were on the fence about receiving the vaccine, but now that the campus can be fully open, they feel it was worth it. 

“I am just happy that I can be back with my friends at my Home by the Sea,” said Kendal Johnson, a second-year business major. “I feel like the vaccine made me feel safe. I am also protecting my older professors and staff here.”

It has been proven that the vaccine saves lives. It can help us get back to our everyday lives since so much normalcy has been taken away from us for almost two years now. Misinformation should not get in the way of saving the life of a parent, grandparent or friend. The vaccine should be mandated in spaces where one is exposed to other people to keep everyone safe.

Reset and Run it Back

Alfred Johnson | Staff Writer

Hampton University’s Homecoming is one of the most long-awaited events on campus. Still, after the world’s continuing battle with COVID-19, changes are being made, and it’s making students raise a brow as to what’s happening. 

The reason is that people were expecting Homecoming to occur a little later in the month. Coming into the school year, students had Homecoming as one of the biggest topics on their minds, specifically if the event was even happening. Because of state and national regulations, students weren’t sure of what to expect.

Little to no one could confirm if one of Hampton’s most popular events would happen, and it left students in a sort of limbo. Word spread that other HBCUs were having to adjust or cancel their Homecoming activities overall. Because of this, Hamptonians became skeptical.

“I felt a little sad because Homecoming is one of those big events that everybody goes to,” Hampton University senior Iman Jones said. “You can meet other people that went to the school. That’s where connections happen.”

Hollands and 12 to 2s feel more like a memory to returning students and a dream to new students. The only thing worse than a fear of missing out is hearing about what you missed. 

It isn’t news that COVID has people missing out on potentially pivotal moments in their lives,  

Therefore, it shouldn’t be surprising that people will expect more from the university. 

For returning students, however, the campus feels more like a ghost town. Less is happening, and people are more hesitant to be out and about with the national mask mandate. Newer students don’t know enough about moving, and returning students are readjusting to being back. 

With the number of campus events being reduced, people are doing their best to hold onto whatever is happening around campus. 

Lines for Homecoming tickets formed a U-turn in the Student Center, and they sold fast. Events like the fashion show, step show and silent party filled up, and students made the most out of every experience. 

Balancing social life with academia is enough of a challenge. With students trying to hit deadlines, subtle pressure is building up, and students are doing their best to make little to no sacrifices in the classroom.

The issue is not with how Hampton is carrying out mandates. If anything, people are more pleased with the fact that the school is taking caution. 

The concern is more around the fact that students don’t know what is going on. It wasn’t until recently that people got news about what is happening with campus events. The questioning isn’t about who said what but what is truthful.

Once people could confirm that HUChella 2.0 was happening, they made sure to attend whatever they could.

“I think it’s cool to have Homecoming, especially for those who weren’t able to experience it,” Jones said. 

All of this to say what? Students aren’t necessarily upset. They’re just confused, and students do not need to throw blame everywhere.

The people and organizations working to push these gatherings and events are doing everything they can to notify students of what will happen and when. With COVID changing our way of life and everyone trying to rebuild, this feeling of disorientation is just a side effect. 

Thanks to the people behind the scenes, students get to continue the Hampton Homecoming tradition and go home with stories from their home by the sea. 

I Don’t Like Guys That Want Girls That Want Girls

Grace Elizabeth Hackney | Staff Writer

With the recent release of Drake’s tenth studio album, Certified Lover Boy, Drake has taken over the Billboard Hot 100 chart with nine of his songs in the top 10. There’s one song that got my attention, the song that holds No. 2 spot on the Billboard Hot 100 charts: Girls Want Girls ft. Lil Baby. 

Songs like Girls Want Girls are harmful and emphasize how romantic relationships between women are not seen as valid relationships.

In Girls Want Girls, Drake says, “She said she a lesbian, girl me too.” Drake is not the first musical artist to fetishize same-sex relationships between women. Many popular songs have fetishized relationships relating to the broader LGBTQIA+ community.

 In 2019, PnB Rock and Lil Skies released a song entitled, I Like Girls, where PnB Rock sings, “I like girls who like girls.” The song that launched Katy Perry’s career was I Kissed a Girl. Coi Leray says, “Couple bad bitches with me and they go both ways” in the song Ocean Prime

Nicki Minaj even has multiple songs where she insinuates women-loving-women relationships even though she is straight. Why is this? Simple answer: misogyny.

Part of what encompasses the LGBTQIA+ movement is the freedom to enjoy your relationships without anyone else inserting themselves or their opinions into it. From what I’ve seen, LGBTQIA+ women do not have that freedom. 

Instead, people fetishize women loving women because, I guess, it’s impossible for a woman to be happy in a relationship that does not involve a man. 

Relationships between LGBTQ+ men are rarely fetishized this way. Most women do not constantly yearn for relationships with gay and, at times, bisexual men.

In our society, women are already objectified for every little thing and seen as objects. 

This is reflected in the way lesbian relationships are often treated as if they are a show for everyone’s enjoyment. Drake’s new song just feeds the fire from which LGBTQIA+ women are trying to escape. 

Girls Want Girls has prompted a TikTok trend of men stitching and duetting videos of lesbians with the song playing in the background. It’s an attempt to show that they are attracted to these women regardless of their sexuality. As if saying “I’m a lesbian” means “try harder to flirt with me.” It does not mean that, by the way. 

Now let me make something clear: I’m not trying to take away Drake’s—or any musical artist’s—artistic license. This is not an attempt to cancel Drake. I’m not telling anyone to stop listening to Drake. I still like Drake’s new album. I understand free speech. 

However, musical artists should be aware if they are spreading content that is harmful to marginalized groups. Truthfully, I do not think Drake knows the effects of the fetishization of lesbian relationships. I doubt he was purposefully trying to be harmful. That still does not mean he is free from accountability. This goes for his listeners as well because the goal is always education and awareness.

And to my men who pine after women in hopes of fulfilling some sort of fantasy: Stop. 

New Legislation Returns California Beach to Black Descendants

 Kaiya Otey | Staff Writer

Photo courtesy of Unsplash user Kirk Wester

California Gov. Gavin Newsom authorized the return of Bruce’s Beach to descendants of the Black family unlawfully evicted from Manhattan Beach almost a century ago. Senate Bill 796, which authorized the return of property back to its rightful owners, was signed into law before a public audience Sept. 30, according to the Los Angeles Times

“As governor of California, let me do what apparently Manhattan Beach is unwilling to do, and I want to apologize to the Bruce family for the injustice that was done to them a century ago,” Newsom said.

The state legislature unanimously passed the bill that has an urgency clause that allows Los Angeles County to begin transferring the land, according to the Times. Additionally, the state of California is officially acknowledging that the city’s taking of the shorefront land, where the Bruce Family ran a popular beach resort for African Americans, was racially motivated and done under false and unlawful pretenses.

Approximately six descendants of the Bruce family and local activists were in attendance when Newsom signed the bill.

“There are other families waiting for this very day, to have their land returned to them,” Patricia Bruce, a cousin of Willa and Charles Bruce, told the Times

Willa and Charles Bruce purchased the property in the Los Angeles suburb Manhattan Beach in 1912 for $1,225, the Times reported. The beach soon became known as “Bruce’s Beach” and was used primarily as a beach resort for Black families, for other local beaches turned them away based on their race. 

Complete with a bathhouse, dance hall and cafe, the resort attracted other Black families who purchased land and created what they hoped would be a prosperous beachfront resort strip, according to City News Service. 

However, the resort quickly became a victim of the area’s white population, according to Inside Edition. Subjected to attacks from the Ku Klux Klan, the obstacles faced by the Bruce Family were many.

The Bruces were undeterred and continued expanding their resort. Still, under increasing pressure, the city moved to condemn their property and other surrounding parcels in 1924, seizing it through eminent domain under the pretense of planning to build a city park. 

The lodge’s owners received $14,500 in subsequent attempts to sue for racial discrimination, but they did not receive the land back, according to NPR. The city barred the Bruce family from purchasing any new ground in the area after they took their land.

“The law was used to steal this property 100 years ago, and the law today will give it back,” County Supervisor Janice Hahn told the Times

The land is now valued at around $75 million, according to Inside Edition. 

The New Mister Pirate: Brenan Holston Has Big Plans for His Title

Morgan Harris | Staff Writer

Photos by Sasha Thorton, Photojournalist

Brenan Holston, a Hampton University graduating senior International Studies major from Atlanta, was crowned the 20th Mister Pirate on Oct. 1, during the Mister Pirate pageant. He competed against four other contestants for the 2021-2022 title. 

Holston is truly the jack-of-all-trades as a college student, and his primary goal is to make a positive change not only on the campus of Hampton University but also in the lives of its students as well.

Holston is a proud member of the Gamma Iota chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Incorporated, serving as the chaplain, treasurer and the candyman — the stroll master for the chapter. He is also a member of the Written Water Writing Club, Model United Nations Club, and Sticky Situation — the percussion section of the Hampton University Marching Force.

Holston has big plans as the new male face of Hampton University. Among his plethora of changes is a potential Mister Pirate name makeover of Mister Hampton University to match the Miss Hampton University title, as this has been a passion of previous Mister Pirates.

In a sit-down interview, the newly crowned senior talks about his time at Hampton and what major changes he hopes to bring with his new title.

HS: What encouraged you to run for Mister Pirate?

BH: “At first, it was a suggestion from my line brothers. I didn’t want to at the time. But then, as I thought it out and what that position means to people, I had to take the time away from them and think, ‘Why not? Be someone [students] can look up to or put yourself in the position.’ At the time, I didn’t know if I would make it or not. I didn’t know if it was a long interview process or if I was even going to win the pageant.”

HS: What sets you apart from the other candidates?

BH: “I think the best way to answer that honestly would be my platform. It’s I.C.E., I Choose Everyone, and it’s for promoting inclusivity and interconnectivity across disciplines to create a more unified student body. I think that my platform’s focus is on just the students. The students that go here, especially in this post-COVID-19 world where we are worried about everything else other than just being at Hampton and just living the college life. I think if anything, that would probably be the most important thing to help me stick out.”

HS: How has your time at Hampton been, and how has it affected you as an individual?

BH: “My time at Hampton … I’m not going to lie. When I first got here, I did not want to be here. I wanted to go [to another college]. I went to a private school where I was a minority, of course, and it was just like a culture shock. It felt like I was just going out of my way to do all this stuff. But over time, and just through the friends I’ve met on the drumline and the friends I’ve met just in regular classes and learning professors, dealing with your fellow Black people is different from dealing with other races. And just learning things over time changed me. I try not to just keep my mind boxed up in one [way] like this is how things need to be. I try to enlighten situations. I think that has changed me over time.”

HS: What are you going to do differently compared to the previous Mister Pirates? What is your agenda?

BH: “From what I’ve understood so far, a lot of what I do seems to be to help Miss Hampton University. I would like to bring the Mister Pirate name and position to something that could stand on its own. Of course, [there have] been 64 Miss Hampton University [students selected] and only 20 Mister Pirates, but I think that to treat it as if [there have] been 64 Mister Pirates would work to implement my platform and more than just that, just to help students. To be a friend for every student, to be a mentor, or if I need to be someone for everyone, that would be the best way to go forward. Even though it’s named Mister Pirate, to treat it as though it’s Mister and Miss Hampton University.”

In his newly added capacity, he is excited to work alongside Zahria Brandon, the 2021-2022 Miss Hampton University, and he believes she will be an excellent partner in their latest venture.

Chadwick Boseman: His Legacy Lives

Trinity Goppy | Staff Writer

In honor of late Howard University alumnus Chadwick Boseman, the school and Netflix have created a $5.4 million scholarship called The Chadwick A. Boseman Memorial Scholarship.

Ted Sarandos, Netflix’s co-CEO and chief content officer, announced the partnership in a news release. 

“He always spoke of his time at Howard and the positive way it shaped his life and career,” Sarandos said. “Now we will have the opportunity to give many future superheroes a chance to experience the same.” 

Howard University President Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick said the scholarship symbolizes Boseman’s love for his alma mater, his passion for the arts and his willingness to support future generations of Howard students. The scholarship funds four years of tuition at Howard’s College of Fine Arts, renamed after Boseman earlier this year. 

Eligible students have to exemplify a drive for excellence, leadership, respect, empathy, passion and exceptional skills in the arts, according to Howard University. The scholarship grants young artists an opportunity to pursue higher education without the stress of financial barriers. 

Howard will distribute the first official scholarship awards this fall to inaugural recipients Sarah Long, Shawn Smith, Janee’ Ferguson, and senior Deirdre Dunkin, according to Howard Newsroom.

Boseman attended Howard University in 2000 to study directing and earned a bachelor’s degree in Fine Arts. His teachers at Howard included Al Freeman Jr. and actress Phylicia Rashad, who later became his mentor and now is the dean of the College of Fine Arts. He later went on to study at The British American Drama Academy in Oxford, England, for graduate school. 

Although he could not financially afford the trip, Rashad raised money with her friend, actor Denzel Washington, according to the New York Times. As a result of their guidance and counsel, Boseman was eligible for several programs and training camps to further his career as an actor. 

Following his “Black Panther” success, Boseman returned to Howard University in 2018 to deliver a commencement address. 

“Whatever you choose for a career path, remember, the struggles along the way are only meant to shape you for your purpose,” he said. “When I dared to challenge the system that would relegate us to victims and stereotypes with no clear historical backgrounds, no hopes

or talents, when I questioned that method of portrayal, a different path opened up for me, the path to my destiny.” 

Boseman used his passionate speech to encourage the graduating class to find a purpose, not just a job. 

“Purpose crosses disciplines,” he told the graduating class. “Purpose is an essential element of you. It is the reason you are on the planet at this particular time in history.”

The scholarship highlights Boseman’s continued connection to Netflix, as two of the actor’s final roles were in partnership with the streamer.

HU Students Offer a TV Guide Through Shows New and Old

 Nia Cain | Staff Writer

Premieres of TV shows can be the highlight of some people’s summer experiences. New shows such as “Generation” and “Clickbait” and returning shows such as “Outer Banks” were the biggest hits of the summer. 

“‘Outer Banks’ is my favorite show because regardless of how much I binge the show, I never get tired of it,” Hampton University sophomore Aniyah Reed said. “The plot is so intriguing and interesting that it leaves the audience wondering what will happen next. I don’t want to spoil it for anyone who has yet to watch, but the new season definitely took me in for a whirl and shocked me in the least expected way.”

Netflix describes “Outer Banks” as a show about an island divided by class, where three teenagers join together to solve the mystery of a legendary treasure. 

Many returning shows have kept viewers interested over the years, such as the anthology series “American Horror Story,” which first aired 10 years ago. 

“A returning show that I would recommend is ‘American Horror Story’ because the previous season, ‘1984,’ was fun and campy … but in a good way, and the most recent season is doing well so far,” HU sophomore Jacob Ethridge said. 

FX describes “American Horror Story” as a show that has “redefined the horror genre with various installments.” 

While shows such as “Outer Banks” and “American Horror Story” returned, many new shows aired this summer. 

“Some of my favorite shows from this summer are ‘Loki,’ ‘Wandavision,’ ‘Generation,’ ‘Invincible’ and ‘Them,’” Webb said. 

“Generation” premiered on HBO Max in March, with people watching it over the summer. “Clickbait” was a new show that premiered on Netflix in August. 

“I loved that I’d never watched a show with that storyline,” HU junior Madison Grant said of “Clickbait.” They did an excellent job of presenting their message in an original way.” 

For those who have not watched ‘Clickbait, Netflix lists the plot as follows, “When family man Nick Brewer is abducted in a crime with a sinister online twist, those closest to him race to uncover who is behind it and why.”

Not all shows garnered positive reviews.

“A show I specifically didn’t like was ‘Spinning Out’ on Netflix,” Ethridge said. “I don’t think the story was done or paced well and ended up not making a ton of sense in my opinion.”

Some shows appeal to broad audiences, while others target only select groups.

“I tried to watch a few shows like ‘F is for Family’ and ‘Ginny and Georgia,’ but
I just couldn’t connect,” HU sophomore Kayla Quinnie said. “It felt like I was being fed content.”

Netflix describes “Ginny and Georgia” as a show about “free-spirited Georgia and her two kids, Ginny and Austin, who move north in search of a fresh start but find that the road to new beginnings can be bumpy.”

“‘Ginny and Georgia’ was overall a really fun show to experience,” Ethridge said. “The dynamic between Ginny and Georgia’s characters seemed very well established and evolved in a way that was slightly predictable but still enjoyable to see come to fruition. Additionally, I loved the side characters and how they influenced the decisions that both Ginny and Georgia made throughout the season.” 

People can have high or low expectations of new shows, or possibly no expectations at all. TV shows can elicit different responses from different people. 

“I was expecting something to just have on in the background, but all of these shows impressed me,” Webb said. 

People watch television for a variety of reasons. The characters and audience of a show can impact people’s final opinions of a show. 

“I look for shows to cater to our new age,” Quinnie said. “[I want] characters who seem real and I can connect to.”