Tag Archives: Ya-Marie Sesay

HU’s Graduate and Professional School Fair

Ya-Marie Sesay | Campus Editor

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As the first semester of the school year comes to an end, Hampton University’s upperclassmen are beginning to think and plan for life after college. HU’s Career Center hosted the 2017 Graduate and Professional School Fair, where students and representatives from various schools and graduate programs had the chance to interact.

Schools from across the country set up their displays in the Student Center Ballroom, awaiting students’ arrival to their respective table. Schools of law, journalism, biomedical sciences, theological seminaries, and others shared information about their programs, scholarships, and opportunities for students.

“We encourage Hampton University students to take advantage of this opportunity,” said Bessie B. Willis, Career Center Director.

Among school representatives, Hampton alumna Stephanie Joy Grigg represented Princeton Theological Seminary at the fair.

Grigg, a graduating senior at Princeton Theological Seminary, was introduced to the institution by two of her Hampton University big brothers during her undergraduate experience.

“They challenged me to go to seminary,” said Grigg. “I wanted to merge the gap between psychology and theology into one, and I chose Princeton.”

Princeton Theological Seminary has various masters programs, the most popular include the masters of divinity, masters in arts and theological study, and masters in theological education. The school requires students to take the GRE exam, complete the application process, and submit a personal statement and statement from their pastor.

“We know enough people have a calling on their life at Hampton and different institutions, so we just want to make ourselves available for those who feel they have a calling on their life and want to go straight into it,” said Grigg.

Representatives Dominique Bannarn and Jane Bartlett from Eastern Virginia Medical School shared information about their post bachelors program and their two-year pathologist’s assistant program as well.

The medical master’s degree program is a post-bachelors program that gives students an opportunity to boost their grades before entering the medical school of their choice. The requirements for the program are the same for medical school; students that complete the program also have high chances of being accepted into EVMS’s medical school.

“We’re literally 30 minutes away and we want Hampton students to know that EVMS is an option for them,” said Bannarn.

The new pathologist’s assistant program is one of 10 in the U.S. designed to increase employees in the pathology. Bartlett encourages students that are self-starters and always go the extra mile to apply. Students practice working with autopsies, grossing (dissecting of a dead body), and learn the entire system of the body.

Bannarn advised HU students when applying for any graduate program to share what makes them unique and ensure the school they select fits them.

“I always tell students to go for what your most passionate about and find a school period that fits them,” said Bannarn.

For students interested in law school representatives from Albany Law School, Emory University Law School, St. John’s University Law School and more shared information about their programs.

“We hold Hampton University in high esteem for years, and I try to get here as much as I can,” said Associate Director of Admissions at St. Johns University, Dorothy Moran.

St. Johns offers many opportunities through a diverse body of disciplines like studying in a global marketplace such as New York, and practicing training skills as a student under the supervision of a professor. The school also has study abroad programs; students can study in Europe and gain 6-8 credits in comparative law, comparing the European and U.S. legal system.

Moran encourages students interested in law school to “Study hard for the LSAT, come and visit to ensure its good fit for you, and do well in school that’s the first thing.”

For more information visit the career center for the list of visiting graduate and professional schools or visit the website of the institutions of your interests.

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HU bookstore gets a new look

Ya-Marie Sesay | Campus Editor

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Courtesy of Ya-Marie Sesay

You asked, it’s here: Hampton’s newly renovated collegiate bookstore.

Students and Alumni entered Hampton University’s Collegiate Bookstore during homecoming week in surprise to the newly renovated look.

“We got nothing but praises! During homecoming week we had some alumni coming in, and even they said it’s great that we’ve gotten an update,” said Michael Scott, a bookstore sales associate and senior international studies major from Delaware.

After months of student input, planning and construction, the HU Administration made another advancement in improving student life on campus.

The remodeled store has more selections for students, such as new apparel choices, increased textbook options, electronics, a variety of snacks, hair products and a new look.

The nearly 20-year-old store is now surrounded with photos of student-athletes, school spirit and students in the library. The wall that divided the clothes and the books has been transformed into a pirate ship showcasing Pirate pride. There is also much more space and vibrant colors.

“It’s a big change, a 180-degree turn,” Scott said. “It’s more open, more decorative. It’s more convenient for us to come from our apartments or dorms and just pick up whatever we need.”

Hampton University’s Auxiliary Enterprises, the office responsible for students’ experience at HU, heard the demands of students for new items in the bookstore and chose to completely rebrand the store to increase student attraction.

“The remodel was an exciting venture; the response has been overwhelmingly positive, and we know there is no other bookstore as great as the one on HU’s campus,” Director of Auxiliary Enterprises Taryn Boone said.

In partnership with Follett Higher Education Group, the university wanted all decisions to completely benefit students. Boone told the Hampton Script she would sit with students in the dining hall and casually ask what they would like to see in their bookstore.

“It was a very beautiful collaborative effort, I feel good about it,” Boone said.

Another great aspect introduced at the start of the semester is the price-match option. Students can compare the price of a textbook in store with prices from Amazon, and Barnes and Noble. The price difference can be given to the student through a bookstore gift card that can be used to purchase the new fashionable apparel and other textbooks.

Students also can order textbooks in store and receive them within 48 hours without shipping expenses.

Many new electronics such as laptops and printers are now available in the bookstore. Students also have the option to charge their electronic expenses to their HU account.

In celebration of the university’s 150 years and President William R. Harvey’s 40th anniversary, the store included a section dedicated to the milestones. The section includes shirts, watches, hats, cups and Dr. Harvey’s recently published book, Principles of Leadership.

“It is my sincere hope that the students embrace it, enjoy it and brag about it all over social media,” Boone said. “Hampton has a high standard of excellence. The students [should] understand change does take time, but the administration [is] always working to give you a positive experience.”

City of Hampton’s 5K race helps West African Orphans

Ya-Marie Essay | Campus Editor

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Courtesy of Ya-Marie Essay

Share Heart Africa raises awareness of West African orphans and widows in the Hampton Roads area during their 5K Race for Hope.

The organization hosted their 5 th annual 5k Race for Hope at the end of September near Warwick High School in Newport News, Virginia. The race is dedicated to raising funds for Sierra Leonean children in need, proceeds will directly impact the education of Sierra Leonean children and microfinancing for caregivers to assist their financial need.

The race began with an 8 a.m. 1-mile run followed by a 5K and 8K race at 8:30 a.m. The cost of participation began at $18 for one mile, $30 for 5K and $45 for 8K.

Saffiatu Harper, founder of Share Heart Africa, also a Sierra Leonean native said she was
inspired to host a 5k run to raise proceeds for Sierra Leonean girls that suffer to get access to an education. Last year the race took place during the August heat and had a greater turn-out than this year. With it being the 5th year the Share Heart Africa’s team had a stress-free planning process.

“It was really good to get a late September date this year, the early morning Autumn breeze felt good especially to our runners,” said Harper. “The event was a success but we definitely need more participants to make a major impact in children’s lives in Sierra Leone.”

Rapheal Kamanga came in first place during the 5K race. The Kenyan native was extremely excited to give back to Africa. He hopes to encourage people to participate in fundraising races to not only live a healthy lifestyle, but to also impact the lives of others through a great cause.

“When you’re doing something for Africa, I feel like you’re doing it for me and doing it for my people,” said Kamanga.

Share Heart in Africa focuses on families in the village of Sierra Leone, and main cities like Freetown, Makeni, Kenema, Gloucester, Waterloo and Grafton.

“Our hope is that each child will fully grow up, take what they have learned, and become an agent of change in their community,” said Harper.

Harper believes the Lord called on her to give back to her country. “My heart’s desire is to fulfill the calling God has placed in my heart by promoting the welfare of children in Africa,” said Harper on Share Heart in Africa website.

The organization was founded in and focuses on seven core values that include family and community, accountability, faith, quality, stewardship, integrity and individualized care. The organization also ensures that each child has basic holistic care through their physical, mental social and spiritual needs for a healthy and well-rounded life.

In mid-August Sierra Leone faced a drastic mudslide killing over 300 people, and destroying many homes leaving over 2,000 people homeless. Many organizations including Share Heart in Africa are currently accepting donations to provide medical, sanitary and food supplies for those affected.

“We look forward to impacting more lives in Sierra Leone, West Africa with other future
events,” said Harper.

Share Heart in Africa is currently looking for hardworking and dedicated volunteers. For more information, please visit their website at http://www.shareheartafrica.org