The Importance of Teaching The African Diaspora

Jamaija Rhoades | Staff Writer

Sitting at my desk, blankly staring into the projector showcasing tons of so-called American heroes, trying hard to stay awake and wondering why I hate history class so much. 

Until I started attending college, history was my least favorite subject. History courses typically left me uninterested and confused about why America is considered a great country. 

It was not until after my first semester of African Diaspora and World History during my freshman year that I realized why history was once such a “snoozefest.” 

Like many Black students in the United States, I did not see myself reflected in the dense archives of the past. The few instances in which I did know a person who looked like me flash on the whiteboard, it was to depict a slave or a peaceful leader who was assassinated. 

Unlike white students, individuals of African descent do not often get the chance to see themselves reflected positively or at all in their history classes. Not only does this lack of information and knowledge negatively impact Black students, but it has proven to have a detrimental effect on how students of other racial backgrounds perceive the Black community as a whole. 

When America’s school systems decide to only tell a portion of American history, it leaves Black students without visual representations of their ancestors’ accomplishments. By failing to acknowledge our culture and our ancestors’ contributions to society, standard education has limited what history Black girls and boys are exposed to.

This lack of emphasis and acknowledgment of the rich history and culture of African Americans in K-12 history classes also helps promote the misconception that all Black people are the same. Neglecting to educate all students about the African diaspora permits the rest of the society to uphold ideas of white supremacy, and it potentially justifies dehumanizing an entire community of people.

I remember the impact that learning about the history of my people had on me. Seeing Josephine Baker not afraid to embrace her sensuality made me feel more confident in my womanhood. Reading Zora Neale Hurston’s works and seeing her highlight the dialect of Black people made me take more pride in my Blackness. 

Being supplied with images and information of American heroes who look like me provided me with the space and imagination to dream bigger. It helped me become unapologetic about my Blackness. 

While Black students can seek outside sources to educate themselves on their history, they should not be forced to do so. Just as white students continue to get spoon-fed information about who they are and what they can become, Black students should be given this same luxury. 

Black history is American history, and it should be recognized as such. Learning about where we come from and who we are can assist us with figuring out where we are going. 

“Learning the extensive background of the African diaspora would be an eye-opening experience for all of us. Acquiring this information will remind us that we are more similar than we think,” said Eboni Turner, a fourth-year Hampton University student in the five-year MBA program. 

Until it is required that ALL students be educated on the African diaspora, the educational needs of Black students will continue to be overlooked. Continuing to not require students to be taught on this subject will emphasize the idea that whiteness is superior, particularly in the educational space as it relates to American history.

Black mental health: A road map to improvement

Miles Richardson | Staff Writer

Black mental health needs to be a top priority for the Biden Administration.

African Americans have historically had less access to affordable health care. According to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, “in 2017, 55.5 percent of blacks compared to 75.4 percent of whites used private health care insurance.”

The reason for this has gone largely unnoticed. This disparity exists because there is a sizable portion of the Black community that lives in mental health deserts. This dynamic has caused a great deal of turmoil within these communities. According to Mental Health America, “Black and African American people living below poverty are twice as likely to report serious psychological distress than those living over 2x the poverty level. Socioeconomic status, in turn, is linked to mental health: People who are impoverished, homeless, incarcerated, or have substance use problems are at higher risk for poor mental health.”

The current wave of mental health decline, combined with mental health deserts within African American communities, will likely lead to a significant rise in arrest rates, substance abuse and suicide attempts.

The effects of this mental health crisis will only be further exaggerated within inner cities. If HBCU students are struggling this much with mental health (see Cover Story), how do you think things will be for the youths and adults who live in communities where wealth and resources are more scarce?

This problem can be solved by actively working to create more diversity in health care professionals through employing policy to encourage future graduates to enter mental health. There is a dire need for more African American mental health care professionals who are from these communities. Having access to culturally educated medical professionals will likely create a more comfortable environment for Black youths and adults to seek help with their mental health battles, combatting the apprehension the stigma around mental health problems generally creates.

This can be achieved by creating relationships between HBCUs and research centers to further professional development, combined with the lessening of medical school debt.

The heroic youths who decide to combat this issue should have every opportunity to do so.

The conundrum known as “cancel culture”

Ryland Staples | Staff Writer

“Cancel culture” has dominated the social media landscape for years. A certain population of social media users pride themselves on their ability to dig up old tweets from celebrities and subsequently “cancel” them for past indiscretions. 

In the recent Dr. Seuss debacle, people have removed him from their reading list because of racist political cartoons and his how he treated his wife. Even products such as Aunt Jemima maple syrup and Uncle Ben’s rice are doing total rebrands due to the Black Lives Matter movement over the summer. 

Let’s get one thing clear first: Dr. Seuss is dead and has been since 1991. It’s not like he can lose any brand deals and opportunities because his past works have come to light. I really don’t get why people are in an uproar about the origin of his works, or him as a person. We all read The Cat in the Hat, The Lorax and several other books he wrote. All of this information that we recently found out has already been out there for years.

As a Black person, it is a little disheartening to see how an author as notable as Dr. Seuss has these kinds of illustrations in his portfolio. But at the same time — not to make any excuses for him — these characters were acceptable during the time. Have you seen the Looney Tunes and Tom and Jerry episodes from that time? They’re filled with racist depictions and stereotypes of Black people and other people of color. 

“Cancel culture” has even brought to the forefront modern celebrities such as Tesla founder and CEO Elon Musk, who uses his Twitter feed as a platform to speak out against cancel culture. His supporters often say that the billionaire is too smart to be canceled, that the rules don’t apply to him. 

This rhetoric has become common among conservitive figures such as President Donald Trump, political commentator Ben Shapiro and other well-known figures. Often people say there is a need to get over it because it either happened in the past or it wasn’t that bad to begin with. This happens even though it feels like they’re just getting themselves into trouble every chance they get. 

This idea of “cancel culture” is often entangled with political correctness culture as well, which has caused a rift in the comedy landscape. With TV shows such as Family Guy, South Park and Rick and Morty, people have begun to think that making jokes at a marginalized group’s expense is what comedy is. 

Comedy should be there to make everyone laugh. There are plenty of jokes that don’t make anyone the butt of the joke. If you’re afraid of what’s going to happen if you talk about your true feelings on something or tell a joke about something perceived as inappropriate, then you should take a look at yourself to see the issue.

Let the Black kids escape, too

Jamaija Rhoades | Staff Writer

Unsplash User: @kristsll

It feels like all recent coming-of-age films such as (but not limited to) Booksmart, Love Simon, To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before and Sierra Burgess is a Loser all revolve around superficial and effortlessly watchable topics. The films tell stories of teenagers whose most significant problems revolve around their grades’ status and where the next hot party will take place.  

While I love a good coming-of-age film (Ferris Bueller’s Day Off is my personal fav), I cannot help but notice that Black teenagers are rarely the main characters within these stories. The few times individuals of African descent have starred in these films, they are either extremely heavy (Moonlight) or seek to make a statement about racism (The Hate U Give). 

This lack of carefree, innocent films that showcase Black teens simply falling in love or having fun without the interruption of discrimination or poverty is related to the popular association of  the Black experience and struggle. 

“I feel like parts of society only view Black people as people who will inevitably struggle through life — that we must face an obstacle, big or small, in our lifetime,” said Meraiah Cannon, a recent nursing graduate from Norfolk, Virginia. 

Of course, I am fully aware that anybody with melanated skin will face some hardships in some shape or form due to things they cannot change. However, I do not believe we need to be reminded of this all the time. 

Most people watch movies to escape their reality or just enjoy a couple of hours where they do not have to be reminded of their struggles in their day-to-day lives. Few people need to escape the realities of life more than people of color, particularly children, yet they rarely get the chance to do so. 

As important as it is to tell these heavy stories that are the realities of many Black people, Black creatives need to also ensure that they are creating films that highlight the innocence of Black teens and Black children as a whole. We often see children of African descent being forced to become adults and be strong in moments that other children are given the space to be vulnerable and make mistakes without extreme consequences. 

Despite what major production companies may believe, the Black community craves more films that showcase Black characters experiencing a sense of normalcy. 

“To see Black teens just getting to be kids and living out their best, normal teenage lives would be a dream come true. We need at least five of those movies within the next five years,” said Simone Williams, an HU graduate student from Newport News, Virginia.

Creating light-hearted coming-of-age films starring Black teens would not only be refreshing, but it would serve as a reminder to the world that despite the color of our skin, we are the same. 

Just as white teens crave love, a good time and adventure, Black teens do as well. Highlighting and emphasizing the reality that Black teens are also teens would assist those individuals who still believe that Black teens are less than. It would help them realize that we are human just as they are. 

Jamaija Rhoades is a graduating senior journalism major with an emphasis in cinema studies from Richmond, Virginia.

Glamour or scam: Teens’ use of substances in media

Kailah Lee | Staff Writer

Unsplash user Matteo Badini

Chances are, if you watch any film or series today, you will see someone using some sort of controlled substance. Whether that be a group of friends comforted by a bottle of booze, smoking cigarettes, or puffing on some “Zaza,” these instances are almost impossible to miss. 

Partaking in substance abuse is justified with older crowds because these actions are understood as adult behaviors. After 21, a person surpasses legal thresholds and is considered grown enough to decide what they should or should not put into their body–illegal or not. 

However, the issue is not adults participating in adult activities on TV. It is the media portraying normalcy in substance abuse among minors.

One might argue that producers are trying to capture the verisimilitude of a high school student. A television show may highlight the reality of events that could potentially happen at a high school party, but are these instances a sample of truth or an extreme? 

In the award-winning HBO hit series “Euphoria,” the story centers on the life of a teenager struggling with a narcotics addiction as well as other teenage turmoil. Although the show reveals the horror and sadness of substance abuse, there is a sense of glamour weaved into the idea of underage drinking and drug use. Scenes of pill-popping are embellished with glitter, neon lights and music.

“Not going to lie, seeing people smoking weed, hearing the music create the vibe and feeling of relaxation made me more curious to try it,” Hampton University student Jamaija Rhoades said. “It looked cool, if I’m being honest.” 

Psychologist Birgit Wolz told the Chicago Tribune that “many films transmit ideas through emotion rather than intellect. … Watching movies can open doors that otherwise might stay closed.”

Substance use usually is painted with the idea of a stressor. An alcoholic beverage can be associated with relief or a lavish event. Marijuana can be associated with a way to unwind and bond with peers. Being compelled to try drugs or engage in drinking is more than seeing the act. It’s also about the aesthetic. 

“Production companies have a way of making it all look beautiful and acceptable while the actors are not even teens,” Hampton alumnus Tyler McColley said.

Media companies cast older actors and actresses to play younger roles because employing minors is a greater liability. Minors have restrictions with hours and content.

According to Screenrant, older actresses and actors ensure that “all potential romances be legal.”

So, it’s OK for an adult to play a teen and assimilate illegal behavior, although that reality is taboo?

That just seems misleading.

HBO said “Euphoria” is actually for adults despite the content circling around teens. Still, the show is viewed more by teenagers than adults. Not to mention, the actress who plays Rue, the main character of “Euphoria,” is Zendaya, who was once a Disney star building her fanbase at a young age.

“Euphoria” is one of many examples of this phenomenon of substance abuse portrayal. There are an abundance of contradictions in the media. One minute there is a commercial demeaning nicotine use among teens, and in the next instance, a hit show is making the act look cool.

An older woman, Natane Herrera, thinks that “the media appeals to a younger audience because they’re looking for potential buy-ins. … With people my age, there’s no point in trying to sell us.”

We’ll never honestly know the media’s intentions. Maybe it’s a subliminal act of business. Perhaps the media is trying to push an image, or maybe it’s just to entertain.

“The media knows what it is doing,” said Amanda Jones, a writer from Charlotte, North Carolina, “and it will target those susceptible to its narrative.” 

Kailah Lee is a graduating senior journalism major from Richmond, Virginia.

Opening Schools Shouldn’t Be the Priority

Ryland Staples | Staff Writer

As the number of serious COVID-19 cases is on the decline, President Joe Biden has made it a part of his 100-day plan to ensure that most K-8 schools reopen to students and teachers. He says that he expects them to be open for the full five days a week like pre-COVID. 

I understand that it’s important for students, especially younger ones, to return to an in-person environment. However, I feel like it’s just flat-out irresponsible to put both students and teachers in that kind of situation. In this situation, they’re not vaccinated and are actively interacting with other people. Without the proper precautions, going to school can worsen the problem.

It has been a tough year for students at any level since COVID-19 shut everything down, but I feel like it has been especially awful for students in the K-8 grade levels. These education levels are crucial for the development of children. 

According to Politico, Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the Institute for Allergies and Infectious Diseases, said that vaccinating all teachers before going back into the classroom would be “non-workable.” So why would President Biden claim to have the grand plan to open up K-8 schools in his first 100 days in office if his top advisers on the pandemic said that it’s “non-workable”? 

This rash decision will not only ravage the teachers, it will impact the children — specifically Black students, who are at a higher risk than their peers. According to the University of Michigan, Black people are three times more likely to get COVID-19. With schools going back to in-person instruction, Black students would have to take more caution if there was a return to school. Understandably, students would want to go back to school, but is it worth putting Black students, Black teachers and their families at risk? 

Due to the pandemic, students have had to stay home and experience virtual learning’s ups and downs. Now we can all confidently say that virtual school isn’t the same as in-person learning. You’re not exclusively paying attention to the lessons, and you’re just not engaged. It has gotten so bad that school systems consider summer school to make up for lack of learning.

I understand the rush for trying to get students back into school buildings and out of the house. If I were in the students’ shoes, I would want to go back as well. It’s been almost a full year since this started. However, people have to make sacrifices, and I know everyone is tired of hearing that phrase. We’ve been collectively hearing it as a country ever since late March of last year. 

However, such a sentiment still remains true. Parents shouldn’t have to worry about whether schools will reopen and potentially send their child back into a potentially contagious environment. President Biden is wrong for making this proclamation without consulting this team of people who are well-versed in this area. 

Ryland Staples is a graduating senior strategic communication major from Silver Spring, Maryland.

FILE – In this Aug. 26, 2020, file photo Los Angeles Unified School District students attend online classes at Boys & Girls Club of Hollywood in Los Angeles. After weeks of tense negotiations, California legislators agreed Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021, on a $6.5 billion proposal aimed at getting students back in classrooms this spring following months of closures because of the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

The Anatomy of Betrayal

 Kailah Lee | Staff Writer

What drives the act of betrayal? There is no one answer because it is layered. Motives can be crafted in experiences, while some are made by foundational beliefs. The act of committing betrayal is almost unforgivable and low, but also irresistible in dire circumstances. 

The question of “why?” arises in hindsight when the committer loses more than he or she intended to gain, but one thing is for sure: the betrayer is often selfish.

In the midst of civil unrest, the Black Panther Party fueled a surge for Black progression. Members challenged the fundamental beliefs of American society while protecting their own.

According to Britannica, the party was founded in 1966 and grew over subsequent years through powerful leadership. It became a staple for Black power. 

For every Black Panther Party member’s life changed, another non-affiliate’s life was threatened. Like Martin Luther King and Malcom X before the party, enemies lurked in the shadows. Ergo, the assainations that followed each legacy.

In Shaka King’s new film, “Judas and the Black Messiah,” King epitomizes the rise and fall of the Black Panther Party through the main characters.  King takes you through the life of the protagonist Fred Hampton as his role as chairman while peeling back the layers of the antagonist, William O’Neal as his role as an FBI informant who infiltrated the party. 

Lakeith Stanfield (William O’Neal) personifies the tragic nature of O’Neal’s actions in a way that makes his character seem more human. You see that O’Neal’s predicament is formed out of desperate circumstances.

In the beginning of the film, O’Neal was involved in a crime that led to him getting pulled over and arrested. He faced up to six years in prison for stealing a car and impersonating a federal officer. At this point in the film, you’re not seeing a criminal or a rat. You’re seeing a man battered from prior conflict.  

The FBI agent asks O’Neal if he “was mad when MLK and Malcom X died,” to which O’Neal responds, “I never thought about it.” O’Neal’s lack of passion toward MLK and Malcom X may have initiated comfortability for the FBI agent to offer O’Neal the deal.

O’Neal’s theft is indicative of an economic struggle to which the FBI chooses to capitalize off of. O’Neal is now in a position to avoid jail time and be reimbursed as an informant.  

“O’Neal was a token black man to do the FBI’s dirty work. He wasn’t heavily involved in black matters and he already had a criminal mind, ” said Darrell Lee, a Richmond, Virginia resident.

Now you see a man, coerced into his decision and partially naive. You almost sympathize with O’Neal  because you see his impulsion and the severity of his predicament.  Throughout the movie O’Neal struggles with internal conflict as he becomes integrated with the organization. As he grows to appreciate the Black Panther Party, you almost hope he’ll have a change of heart, but O’Neal was consumed from within.

Warner Bros. Entertainment held a virtual summit, “The Anatomy of Betrayal” to deconstruct the elements of William O’Neal’s (Lakeith Standfield) character. 

“You don’t meet a lot of Fred Hamptons; you don’t meet a lot of people who are willing to die for their beliefs, but you do meet people who make pragmatic choices all the time,” said twin actor and writer  Keith Lucas.

O’Neal was a troubled man prior to coming into contact with the FBI agent. If he had made better decisions, he would have avoided the deal all together. You really see how a person can be consumed by their choices they choose to make. 

The act of committing betrayal just doesn’t happen; it’s premeditated. Thoughts marinate and grow stronger through incentives. It’s unnatural to go against your morals, there’s always some kind of personal gain.

In O’Neal’s case, he received today’s equivalent of $200,000 dollars, which back in the 60’s was worth a whole lot more, and freedom. Yes, he is wrong, but his actions are understandable. 

“I know a lot of brothers who when they watch this movie, they’re probably going to see themselves more like Will than like Fred,” said Lucas.

It’s truly because human nature is imperfect. It’s full of mistakes and poor decisions and although William O’Neal was the bad guy, you see his “why?”

“We have to give ourselves…a chance to tell stories, we have to see perspectives that we are uncomfortable with, this is the only way we expand,” said Actor Lakeith Stanfied. 

The conflict in history and in stories is what people learn from. Like the biblical reference, Judas betrayed Jesus for monetary gain just as O’Neal did Fred Hampton. 

Whether the betrayal happens in B.C or in 1967, you learn that selfish or sinful acts never end well. Both Fred Hampton and Jesus Christ were killed because of an act of betrayal.

The real William O’Neal would later commit suicide and Judas’ acts would lead to blasphemy.

So, the question stands.  What does one truly gain from betraying?

Courtesy of Warner Bros. Entertainment

“Judas and the Black Messiah”: The Anatomy of Betrayal

 Kailah Lee | Staff Writer

Warning: This movie review contains spoilers for “Judas and the Black Messiah.”

What drives the act of betrayal? There is no one answer because it is layered. Motives can be crafted in experiences, while foundational beliefs make others. The act of committing betrayal is almost unforgivable and low, but also irresistible in dire circumstances. 

The question of “why?” arises in hindsight when the committer loses more than he or she intended to gain, but one thing is for sure: The betrayer is often selfish.

Amid civil unrest, the Black Panther Party fueled a surge for Black progression. Members challenged the fundamental beliefs of American society while protecting their own.

According to Britannica, the party was founded in 1966 and grew over subsequent years through powerful leadership. It became a staple for Black power. 

For every Black Panther Party member’s life changed, a non-affiliate’s life felt threatened.

In Shaka King’s new film, “Judas and the Black Messiah,” King epitomizes the rise and fall of the Black Panther Party through the main characters. King takes the audience through the life of protagonist Fred Hampton (portrayed by Daniel Kaluuya) as chairman of the party while peeling back the layers of the antagonist, William O’Neal (LaKeith Stanfield), an FBI informant who infiltrated the party. 

Stanfield personifies the tragic nature of O’Neal’s actions in a way that makes his character seem more human. O’Neal’s predicament is formed out of desperate circumstances.

At the beginning of the film, O’Neal is involved in a crime that leads to him getting pulled over and arrested. He faces time in prison for stealing a car and impersonating a federal officer. At this point in the film, audience members are not seeing a criminal or a rat. They are seeing a man battered from prior conflict.  

The FBI agent asks O’Neal if he “…was mad when MLK and Malcolm X died,” to which O’Neal responds, “I never thought about it.” O’Neal’s lack of passion toward Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X may have initiated the FBI agent’s comfort to offer O’Neal the deal. O’Neal then is in a position to avoid jail time and be reimbursed as an informant.  

Viewers see a man coerced into his decision and partially naive. Some might sympathize with O’Neal because of the severity of his predicament. Throughout the film, O’Neal struggles with internal conflict as he becomes integrated within the organization. As he grows to appreciate the Black Panther Party, audiences could wonder if he will have a change of heart.

Warner Bros. Entertainment held a virtual summit, “The Anatomy of Betrayal,” on Feb. 2 to deconstruct the elements of O’Neal’s character. 

“You don’t meet a lot of Fred Hamptons,” writer-producer-director Keith Lucas said. “You don’t meet a lot of people who are willing to die for their beliefs, but you do meet people who make pragmatic choices all the time.” 

O’Neal was a troubled man before coming into contact with the FBI agent. If he had made better decisions, he might have avoided the deal altogether, but a person can be consumed by the choices they choose to make. 

The act of committing betrayal doesn’t suddenly occur. It’s premeditated. Thoughts marinate and grow stronger through incentives. His actions may be understandable to some. 

“I know a lot of brothers who when they watch this movie, they’re probably going to see themselves more like Will than like Fred,” Lucas said.

Human nature is imperfect. It’s full of mistakes and poor decisions, and although O’Neal is the bad guy, one begins to understand his “why.”

“We have to give ourselves a chance to tell stories,” Stanfield said. “We have to see perspectives that we are uncomfortable with. This is the only way we expand.”

Balancing act: Going to school and having an internship

Ryland Staples | Staff Writer

Let’s be honest, attending school has been a little rough over the past year. With the sudden shift to online instruction last March due to the global pandemic, students who were working at an internship while they were in school were suddenly working from home. 

I was one of those students, working at WAVY TV 10 in Portsmouth as a digital communications Intern. I was going to the station three times a week. It was an amazing experience and allowed me to experience working at a local TV station. When the pandemic hit, I was forced to come back home and continue my internship from my desk, 200 miles away from the station. 

I tried to keep up with the workload of both school and WAVY TV, but working on everything in one place was overwhelming for me. When my internship with WAVY eventually ended, I realized that I was overwhelmed because I was so used to being in the office. Without being in the office, I had a more challenging time trying to put my mind to what I need to do. 

Even while I was at school and didn’t have an internship, I never did any of my schoolwork in my dorm/room. I always did my schoolwork in the library, a place I associated with being productive. With the sudden change, I had to figure out the best way for me to be my most productive, even when I’m somewhere I don’t associate with productivity. 

During the fall semester, I was fortunate enough to secure an internship with the D.C. Public Charter School Board. I had to build my internship schedule around my school schedule, but having to make sure that class and work meetings didn’t overlap was a struggle. 

The first thing I had to do was make sure I had a set schedule where I worked exclusively on projects related to my internship. My first class started at 11 a.m. on most days, so I decided that from 9 to 11 a.m., I would exclusively work on my internship. On the other hand, my days usually ended around 3 p.m. to work on my internship from 3 to 6 p.m. Now I’m not perfect. Sometimes I wouldn’t be able to stick to my schedule, and I would work on internship responsibilities or schoolwork in the middle of the day and vice versa. Having that balance is essential, especially when it comes to online school. 

Last semester was tough, to say the least. Being able to have a set schedule brought some structure to my life. It would be best if you didn’t have to put your schooling at risk in order to give yourself an edge in the future. With just a bit of preparation, you can put your best foot forward at both!

The debacle known as Cyberpunk 2077

Ryland Staples |Staff Writer

Video games took the world by storm in the latter part of 2020 when the new PlayStation 5 (PS5) came out in early November. Everyone wanted to get their hands on the new console to have the latest and greatest gaming machine. Some tried to get it to play next generation (next-gen) games such as “NBA 2K 21” and “Spider-Man: Miles Morales” or wanted it in order to resell the PS5 to make a profit. There has been one game that has been on gamers’ minds since it was initially announced back in 2012, “Cyberpunk 2077.” 

The futuristic first-person role-playing-game (RPG) based in the far-off year of 2077 was first announced to the public in 2012. When the full game was released Dec. 10, 2020, gamers quickly realized that game was, for lack of a better word, broken. 

Players would randomly not be able to move or would be flung across the map. Non-Playable-Characters (NPC) would appear and disappear at random, or their faces would be distorted. There are plenty of videos and pages on YouTube dedicated to making compilation videos of “Cyberpunk 2077” glitches.  

Game consoles were pushed to their absolute limits just to run the game. There were major problems that made the game unplayable. The game was so bad on some console generations that Sony pulled the game from its online store and created ways for people to get a refund. 

A demonstration of “Cyberpunk 2077” was shown at Electronic Entertainment Expo 2018. The event showcased the game and the vibrant life within Night City. However, it has been recently discovered following the game’s release that the developer of the game, CD Projekt Red, had pushed the restart button in 2016. The demonstration that was shown in 2018 supposedly showcasing the game was almost entirely fake. 

CD Projekt Red recently released a video on Twitter apologizing for “Cyberpunk 2077” and said the game “did not meet the quality standard we wanted to meet.” The company is known for producing one of the best games this past decade in “The Witcher 3,” so it was surprising this game would have so many problems.

It’s strange that a game that was infamously known for delays can still come out like this. At first, “Cyberpunk 2077” was going to be released April 16, 2020, but the game suffered from a series of delays through the year before it was released Dec. 10.

Since CD Projekt Red was delaying the game, it would seem the company would not want its development teams to participate in “crunching,” which is the action of game developers working on the game for hours at a time over multiple days.

According to a Bloomberg article, “There were times when I would crunch up to 13 hours a day,” said Adrian Jakubiak, a former audio programmer for CD Projekt Red. “… A little bit over that was my record probably — and I would do five days a week working like that.”

As someone who enjoys playing video games to relax and escape from reality for a little while, I don’t want my enjoyment of a video game to come at the cost of someone not being able to spend quality time with their family and loved ones. I also think it’s very inconsiderate to release a game that was half-finished at best out to the public in order to make a quick buck off the game’s name.