Traditional vs. nontraditional: Whose college is better?

Tianna Bradford | Staff Writer

VS

Courtesy of Chelsea Harrison

As we go home for break and we see our family, other cousins and siblings who are also in college, there’s always the debate of whose school is better and has the more leading potential.

I’ve always asked myself what it’d be like if I went to a non-traditional school. If my campus were in the heart of New York or Chicago, would I still have the same school spirit?

I interviewed Kayla Bradford, a junior psychology major at Pace University in Manhattan, New York.

I asked her what it’s like to go to a college where you have no football stadium, no huge cafeteria or your own school building, for that matter.

“It seems as though we have no school spirit, if that makes sense,” she said. “We’re so independent amongst ourselves, we merely act as individuals rather than a unit.”

Their Pleasantville campus in upstate New York holds all of their football and basketball games. A large traditional campus like Hampton is better at holding more students and more social activities.

“You know when I think about it, I barely know anyone on campus,” Bradford said. “We only have three to four buildings that we consider our campus. Sometimes I wish I went to a traditional college.”

As we view Hampton, the Real HU has a lot to offer just like any traditional campus: a large view of Greek life, athletics and even internship opportunities.

I asked a Hampton woman, Pride Harper, a pre-pharmacy major from Newport News, her stance on a traditional campus versus a more urban life campus.

“I feel like life at a traditional campus definitely gives more of the college experience compared to being in more of an urban setting,” Harper said.

Pride thinks she’s more social at a traditional campus compared to a campus in New York, L.A. or Chicago.

But internship opportunities are more prominent at urban campuses than at a traditional campus. Traditional campuses are more far out of from big cities than urban colleges that are wrapped around a district full of opportunity.

“When I think about internship opportunities around me, it seems more difficult to find something in the Hampton area or even sometimes the 757,” Pride said.

No matter how you view it, both schools benefit the two different college students: one who is a social butterfly who enjoys meeting new people and wants the “real” campus feel, while the other enjoys the city scenery and is more to herself and lives for the small campus lifestyle.

Either way, both contribute to the growth of attending students.

Which one would you choose?

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