Monthly Archives: November 2017

Fabulous fall footwear

Leenika Belfield-Martin | Lifestyle Editor

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Courtesy of Leenika Belfield-Martin

Fall has officially arrived at Hampton. Multi-colored leaves are everywhere, and the days are shorter. Worst of all, the temperature has dropped. But, don’t fret my fellow Hampton women; you can still slay some cute shoes even if the weather isn’t so welcoming.

Mion Edwards, a senior journalism major, marketing minor from D.C. is Hampton’s resident fashionista. Edwards runs a fashion blog and has recently begun personal styling. Edwards created her blog, Styles by Mion, four years ago. It focuses on women empowerment, fashion and lifestyle.

She gets her shoe inspiration from other fashion bloggers and from Teen Vogue’s editor-in-chief, Elaine Welteroth.

“Shoes can definitely enhance the outfit. [Shoe choice] is the determining factor [as to] whether your outfit is casual [or] more refined.” Edwards said. “Jeans, a t-shirt and sneakers have a different feel than jeans, a t-shirt and pumps.”

According to Edwards, a fashionable woman needs these three shoes in her closet during the fall: a long, to-the-knee boot, a bootie and a pair of UGGs.

Long, riding boots are a timeless fall shoe. They are perfect for the weather because they cover the entire foot, as well as parts of the calf and sometimes thigh. “This type of boot is durable, and you can still be cute in it.” Edwards said.

UGGs are classic fall shoes that almost every girl, and even some guys, have in their wardrobe. The classic UGG boots can be worn with both casual and dressy outfits.

However, avoid wearing these shoes in the snow in rain, unless you get the waterproof ones.

Edwards said that her favorite trend of this season is, “booties, booties and more booties because they come in different shapes in sizes. Some have little belt around them, [while others] have stars and little accessories or some embellishment on it.”

The best part about booties is that they give the illusion of a heel without the discomfort.

Edwards said that this season’s key colors for shoes are black, forest green, gray, burgundy, and olive green. Other fall colors are tan, brown and sienna.

Shoe accents will make your outfit pop. Animal print patterns can be paired with a dark pair of jeans and a neutral-colored shirt to create a clean yet daring look.

This season, don’t be afraid to wear shoes with loud colors, such as bright red or yellow; just make sure that the other elements of your outfit are complimenting your shoes.

Popular and affordable clothing retailers, such as Forever 21 and H&M, are one-stop shops for tops, bottoms, accessories and shoes. Other shoe stores that offer student discounts include Steve Madden, TOMS, Boohoo and Missguided.

Also, Charlotte Russe has an in-store and online “Tuesday Shoesday,” offering sales on all shoes every week. Every order $50 and over is shipped free, too.

Edwards recommends the black-owned business, Pink Plastic Babes, as well.

Shoe subscription boxes are the newest way to shop shoes. ShoeDazzle sends customers a pair of shoes monthly for as low as $39.95 each.

The site even has a quick “Style Quiz” that customers can take to get a refined selection of shoes that fit their style. When customers purchase their first style, they are only charged $10.

JustFab is another shoe subscription service that is similar to ShoeDazzle. With JustFab, however, customers are offered free shipping for purchases $50 and over.

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Now IS the time to talk about gun control

Jordan Benefiel | Staff Writer

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Jennifer Palacios, center, biological mother of 14-year-old Annabelle Pomeroy, who died in a mass shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas, is comforted by her son, Timothy Rodriguez, left, and her mother, Diana Palacios, at a memorial service in Sutherland Springs on Nov. 6. | Photographer: Jay Janner | The Associated Press 

 

The gun control debate is heating up again after the latest horrific mass shooting.

A couple weeks ago, the deadliest mass shooting on U.S. soil took place in Las Vegas, and nothing involving gun control was initiated.

Now here we are again, faced with another tragic shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas. On Nov. 5, Devin Kelley walked into Sutherland Springs’ First Baptist Church and opened fire.

He killed a total of 27 people, ages ranging 18 months to 77, with half of his victims being children, making this shooting the largest in Texas’ history.

The police have confirmed that the attack was not racially or religiously motivated. People close to Kelley described him as unwell and disturbed.

He was dishonorably discharged from the military for domestic abuse, an offense that should have barred him from buying guns.

Despite his being able to acquire an AR-566 as well as some smaller firearms with his discharge record, he initially went to the church to kill his mother-in-law, according to police reports that threatening text messages had been sent to her by him prior to the attack.

The pro-gun control activists and politicians are calling for more stringent background checks for firearm consumers, preventing people with mental illnesses from purchasing and owning guns.

Common sense laws around gun control are, well, common sense, and the pro-gun right people know that. That’s why their usual responses are short on facts and full of emotion. However, in this case, there’s a factor that they feel somewhat vindicates their rhetoric, specifically that the only thing that can stop a bad person with a gun is a good person with a gun.

Shortly after the church shooting, Kelley was stopped after a bystander shot him in the leg and torso as he was fleeing the crime scene, leading pro-gun proponents such as the NRA to prop him up as their hero.

When asked about gun suppporters’ views on gun control in cases like the church shooting, Kennedy Peace, a first year strategic communications major, said, “Even though Malcolm X once said, ‘Sometimes you have to pick the gun up to put the gun down,’ I disagree. I believe violence only brings temporary results. So, instead of stopping a bad person with a gun by having a good person with a gun, I think that there needs to be action taken at the source of the problem, which, believe it or not, is not solely about the gun, but the person behind the trigger.”

Get in the Game: Sports industry experts visit HU

Amber Smith | Staff Writer

Getinthegame

Hampton University

Experts came and shared valuable insight on the ins and outs of the sports industry with Hampton University students during a panel discussion in Scripps Howard Auditorium last week.

On November 8th, panelists Kelli Webb, publicist and founder of the KBD group, Aaron Rouse, former NFL safety, Carl Francis, NFLPA Director of Communications, and Tony Brothers, NBA referee all graced Scripps with an open forum.

Scripps professor, April Woodard and students from her JAC 320 class hosted the event and had the opportunity to ask panelists current event questions.

Panelists were each interviewed individually then as a panel.

Questions were raised as to how to react in a crisis, respond to social issues, and remain professional when dealing with celebrity clients.

Many of the experts also gave advice on how to prosper in the industry.

“In cases where clients do feel the need to speak up it is our job to help them harness the power of their platform and tweak their messaging so that it is presented in a way that it is intended to be,” said Webb.

Students were interested in how the panelists responded to the recent movement with athletes kneeling during the national anthem and the controversy surrounding the issue, while remaining professional.

“If I was still in the NFL I would’ve definitely taken a knee, regardless how you feel about Colin Kaepernick,” said former NFL safety Carl Francis.

“It is important for us to really come together as a Black community and show unity.”

Panelists also discussed a major aspect of the sports industry: the power of social media as a positive and negative tool.

Brothers provided a first-hand account of social media’s impact when talking about the death threats he received via social media after officiating a big game.

“After I called a play at a game I received a death threat from someone and the police had to stay with me for a couple hours after the game to be sure nothing was going to come about from that threat,” NBA referee, Tony Brothers said.

The sports industry may not always be all fun and games but many of the panelists insist that working hard and making the right contacts while using your resources is the ultimate key to succeed in this business.

Hampton students get out the vote

Kyra Robinson | Staff Writer

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Courtesy of Kyra Robinson

Virginia kept its “blue status” after Tuesday’s gubernatorial election, where all three Democrats gained their sought political seats.

Ralph Northam beat Republican Ed Gillespie for governor with 53.9% of the vote. Justin Fairfax defeated Republican Jill Vogel for the position of lieutenant governor, and Mark Herring gained his second term as the attorney general of the state.

Another notable win was the victory of Democrat Danica Roem, the first openly transgender elected official in Virginia as a state Delegate, whom beat 11 term seat holder and openly transphobic, Bob Marshall

Various organizations on campus worked many weeks prior to the election day to emphasize the power of the college student’s vote.

Nationwide organizations with Hampton-based chapters, like “Next Gen and Generation Action,” coordinated the “Get Out The Vote” weekend where students volunteered by canvassing and phone banking on campus and around the Hampton Roads .

Junior Alexis Weston, who is a part of both of those organizations, felt that Hampton students were very engaged in this election due to President Trump’s win in 2016. She observed that there was a significant amount of Hampton students at the polls on election day.

“It’s important for college students to vote because we truly get affected by these laws. This is the world that we’re about to walk into so we need to make it into something that helps our community,” she said.

Sophomore Aman Tune was also involved with raising voting awareness and worked the polls for two hours. Though it was cold and rainy, she felt that she made an impact as she assisted voters on all the proper procedures.

“I was able to hand out sample ballots and talk to voters about who was on the ballots,” she expressed, “It was great being of service to the community and doing my part to get people out to vote.”

During the time she worked the polls, Tune also observed a large turn out in Hampton student voters.

“To see how many students were getting on and off the shuttles was great,” she expressed, “I was so proud to see Hampton students going out and taking part in this election because it is so important. The numbers looked great and ultimately led to a victorious day.”

According to election statistics, 71.6% of those who voted in Hampton voted for Ralph Northam. After commuting to Phoebus High School to cast their ballots, Hampton University students who identified as Democrats were pleased with these results.

Sophomore Kamili Rosenbaum voted early that morning and even though she did not see many people when she went, she knew that Hampton students were more engaged for this election.

“The students were definitely more involved this year because we were so upset about Trump’s election last year, and we knew there would be a problem if we did not get out there,” Rosenbaum said later that day, “If we have problems with who is running our country, the best time to resolve them is right now. Our voices matter more than ever.”

 

Tiffany Haddish takes on SNL

Naomi Ludlow | Arts & Entertainment Editor

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Tiffany Haddish is the first African-American comedienne to host the show Saturday Night Live in its 42 seasons.

Haddish got personal in her opening monologue. She discussed her experience in foster care and how that steered her onto the path of comedy. With the help of her counselor, Haddish discovered that her talent could save her from her troubled ways.

Early on, Haddish received advice from some of the greatest comedians, specifically Richard Pryor. She told The Los Angeles Times that Pryor encouraged her to have more fun on stage. “I took that philosophy with me and I do that in everything I do,” said Haddish.

Haddish made her way to television starting with the OWN series If Loving You Is Wrong. Later, she starred as the role opposite of David Allen Grier in NBC’s The Carmichael Show. However, Haddish’s break-out role was in the 2017 film Girls Trip, starring Queen Latifah, Jada Pinkett Smith and Regina Hall.

Sophomore Lashae Alexander said, “Tiffany Haddish was hilarious in Girls Trip. She was the life of the party and I’m sure she reminded everyone of that one friend within any circle.”

On Saturday Night Live, Haddish addressed the topic of sexual harassment, an issue that has been relevant in news within the last few weeks. A few big shots in Hollywood have recently addressed allegations about them sexually harassing individuals years ago.

Haddish gave a “Tiff Tip” to men involved in sexual misconduct. The comedienne said, “If you have your ‘thing thing’ out and she still has on her clothes, then you’re wrong.” Like any SNL host, Haddish successfully addressed relevant issues while still maintaining a sense of humor. The sketches throughout the show all touched on the controversial topic as well.

The episode featured a sketch connecting politics and the sexual misconduct allegations. Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore discussed the possibility of losing his seat due to allegations of sexual relations with a 14-year-old girl.

Not only was there a political connection in the sketches, but also a personal connection to an upcoming Haddish project. The sketch The Last Black Unicorn shares the name of Haddish’s book that will be released next month. Be on the lookout for this project if you want life tips from Haddish or simply want to know more about her.

Haddish will return to the big screen in an upcoming film called Night School, with Kevin Hart. Haddish is also said to be starring in a new sitcom with Tracy Morgan.

Inside interview with artist Kelela

Selena Roberts | Staff Writer

Kelela Mizanekristos, otherwise known as Kelela, is a singer/songwriter who is far from afraid to express herself.

She experiments with her music and seeks to break down barriers with her craft. Kelela is known for her debut mixtape, Cut 4 Me, her EP, Hallucinogen, and her most recent album, Take Me Apart.  Recently, our Arts and Entertainment writer, Selena Roberts, had the pleasure of interviewing her.

SR: What are your musical influences?:

K: I have a lot of different influences. Some are abstract and some are literal. They include Natalie Cole, Joni Mitchell, Janet Jackson, Whitney Houston, and Mariah Carey.

SR: What is your background in music?:

K: Neither of my parents played music. I played the violin for about ten years [starting] in the fourth grade. I would [also] sing in choir.

SR: How would you describe your music?:

K: I would say that it is rooted in R&B. Vocally, that is where I am coming from in terms of style. In terms of production, I am influenced in electronic. When I think about making music on machines, I think of Stevie Wonder, Prince, and Timbaland.

SR: What advice would you give someone who is trying to make it in the music industry?:

K: There are different stages of your journey. Identifying where you are in your journey first is important. There’s a lot of frustration when you do not know where you are.

People [also] need to remember that there’s so much work and so much effort needed. There’s a lot of failure, and not in an abstract sense. It’s important for people to be okay with where they are first in their journey. Think [more] about being honest than being big. Be true to yourself before selling it to other people.

SR: How would you describe your sense of style?:

K: I’m all things. There are different moods for different events that I go to. When I dress for a show, I have to be comfortable. I have to be able to move and jump in [my outfit]. There can’t be any restrictions. It’s hard to pinpoint my actual style. I always wanted to embody different things. There’s an element of futurism. I would say there is something classic that exists in the thread that I like. It’s about mixing and matching.

SR: How do you calm down before a performance?:

K: I practice scales. I’ll practice scales in the shower. It’s a good way to calm down and be in my own universe. I enjoy being quiet. I’ll try to find a way to be confined.

SR: Where do you see yourself in the next 10 years?:

K: Hopefully, there’s elements of this that I don’t know. There’s elements that I can’t predict. Definitely enterprise, building a business that helps other women in the music industry, specifically women of color.

I want to give them a set of tools that will help them navigate the industry. There’s a reality check that women will go through. My interest is to provide an institution for artists, [especially] women of color, to come in, get briefed and get a set of tools to thrive.

There are black people in the industry on the artist perspective; but on the business side, it is shocking to see the lack of people of color.

SR: What would you be doing now if you were not performing?:

K: I would be pursuing a PhD, to be honest. I would be getting [a PhD for] doing the same thing I am doing now through the music platform.

SR: What social media platforms can your fans find you on?:

K: Mainly on Instagram and on Twitter. I have a Facebook page that is less personal, I would say. I am not as active on Snapchat. Those are the main outlets for me.

Want to get to know Kelela a bit more? Check out her latest project, Take Me Apart, available on Apple Music, and follow Kelela on Twitter and Instagram @kelelam.

HU students get a taste of the tech industry

Leondra Head | Local & World Editor

Spotify

Hamptonians are gaining insightful knowledge from leaders in the technology sector on endless career opportunities the technology industry has to offer. Nine Hampton students were selected to participate in Spotify’s HBCU Opening Act Conference from a pool of over 1,000 applicants who applied.

Spotify offered the conference to students who attend HBCU’s and are interested in pursuing careers in the music-tech and media industries. Students sat with executives and leaders within music, tech and media industries and were provided with insight on how to achieve career goals in these industries.

Nia Wellman, a junior strategic communications major, learned more about the technology industry and is applying her knowledge to her internship applications at various technology companies.

“I gained a wealth of knowledge from the Spotify conference. Before applying, I had no idea what I was getting myself into. I thought the tech industry was only for engineers and coding ‘geeks,’” said Wellman. “However, to my surprise, I learned that there is a place for marketing, public relations, creative and much more. Simply taking this leap of faith and applying [for] this opportunity allowed me to broaden my knowledge of the tech industry.”

Wellman was glad to be exposed to more than what she usually witnesses in Hampton’s Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications.

“I gained more insight of the world outside of the traditional media that I’m used to in Scripps. I’ve already begun applying to opportunities in the tech industry like Google, Spotify and Venmo.”

Throughout the conference, students visited other tech and media companies like Snapchat, NBC Universal and Venmo.

Freshman Kibraya Kafele learned how to brand herself and networked with NBC Universal recruiters, where she plans to intern this summer.

“Coming into the conference, I was very nervous. I didn’t know how to make connections or what I even wanted to do with my degree after graduation. However, after the conference, I came back to Hampton with a different mindset from which I left with,” said Kafele. “I had the opportunity to visit NBC Universal and was so amazed that I decided to send out an inquiry to become an intern this summer. This conference expanded my HBCU family and allowed me to gain a lot of confidence.”

Malcolm Lott, a sophomore strategic communications major, credited the conference to being the best four days of his life and said the experience allowed him to return to campus smarter and wiser.

“I learned that my journey in life has literally just started and that my ambition will keep me hungry throughout the journey. Spotify opened my eyes to a world that I never paid much attention to,” said Lott. “I gained a new outlook on my life. This experience humbled me to continue my passion and strive for greatness.”

Many of the Hampton students plan on applying to internships for full-time roles with Spotify. Graduating senior Arielle Wallace gained a strong HBCU network.

“This conference allowed me to get my foot in the door with some of the biggest tech companies in the world while connecting me to an incredible network of HBCU students from across the country,” said Wallace. “I learned that the HBCU world extends across all fields and reaches to the executive level. I plan on applying to non-technical roles at Spotify.”

James Weaver IV, a senior strategic communications major, plans to apply for tech internships and has since gained connections from the conference.

“My experience with Spotify was amazing. I made connections with several black students and professionals and ultimately gained a firmer understanding of how I can uniquely benefit any company,” said Weaver. “I also plan to apply for internships with NBC Universal and Venmo.”

The Career Center is here for you!

Ivana Spurlock | Contributing Writer

Hampton University students have a guide on campus to assist them in all their professional endeavors—the Career Center.

The facility provides adequate services including teaching professional skills, resume building, practicing mock interviews and more.

“Each year we want [students] to come to the Caree Center to interact with us”, said Bessie Willis, director of the Career Center.

As a Hampton alumna herself, Willis has proudly served her alma mater in the capacity of director since 2010. “I love what I do,” Willis said. “I love seeing students go out and be successful; Hampton students choose to be successful.”

Hampton’s stellar reputation allows the Career Center to stay in contact with major companies that recruit Hampton students.

The staff also researches and contacts other companies that seem fit for the student body. These efforts result in a plethora of events that the Career Center offers, including the Career Fair (Fall and Spring), Graduate and Professional School Fair in November, company information sessions, mock interviews, professional interviews and resume building offered daily.

Under Willis’ leadership the past seven years, the Career Center has increased the number of companies that visit the campus, built a resourceful computer lab where students can come and work on resumes and research companies, provided career assessment tools and increased their research on companies to provide students with ample information.

The Career Center staff members now have more technological advancements when preparing students.        They are currently promoting an “E-Recruitment” process that enables students to submit their resumes online.

Students who register for the system have access more than 3,000 companies they can get in contact with.

Once students take the initiative to sign up, they can access the system at home or even on their cell phones.

E-Recruitment allows students to gain exposure by submitting their resumes and networking with reputable companies.

“Quite a few students that take advantage of the Career Center opportunities walk away with job offers in senior year and sometimes even junior year,” said Willis.

MEAC battle at HU against NC Central

Harrington Gardiner | Contributing Writer

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Yankee Johnson (#2) | Courtesy of Glenn Knight

After a three-point loss to Bethune-Cookman in Daytona Beach, Fla., the Pirates face their toughest test of the season this upcoming weekend against North Carolina Central.

Central is coming off an impressive 42-14 homecoming win against Delaware State, and now the Eagles will come to town sitting a game above the Pirates with a 6-2 record. The Pirates, however, are sitting at 5-3 with a 4-1 record in MEAC play and must now put Saturday’s loss to the side to focus on this much-anticipated matchup.

Prior to this past Saturday’s game, Hampton coaches acknowledged the importance of the inter-conference battle against NC Central. However, like any team, they were focused on the task ahead: to handle Bethune-Cookman on the road.

Pirates defensive coordinator Kevin Ketchum stressed the importance of focusing on the task ahead.

“We know Central is very good; they’ve lost one game in this last three years in the league, and that was last week to Norfolk State,” Ketchum said. “Do we have a game plan? No. We have our plan of how to practice, and you don’t change that.”

Ketchum also discussed the Pirates’ 5-2 record and the landscape for the rest of the season in MEAC play.

“So far, 5-2 has been successful, but there’s four left,” he said. “Now, with four left, that can go 9-2, or that can go 5-6. I don’t see anything that would lead me to believe that any of the last four are going to be easy.”

Injuries are another factor that could decimate a football team, and they have impacted some games already. Ketchum addressed that by saying, “You’re deep into the season, so try to get some kids who are hurt back onto the field so that you have a full complement of players to be ready for Saturday.”

The Pirates fell just short on Saturday afternoon against Bethune-Cookman. They had 125 yards rushing along with one rushing touchdown and a 6.8 passing average per attempt. Hampton also had two passing touchdowns, both of which were thrown by quarterback Delmon Williams to wide receiver Ronald Bell. Bell had 119 all-purpose yards, 79 of which were receiving.

This game had been controlled by Bethune-Cookman for the first half, but after halftime, Hampton came back to take a lead late in the third quarter. Even after the Pirates took a 21-17 lead, the Eagles scored late in the fourth quarter with a 7-yard touchdown pass by wide receiver Jawill Davis, making it a 24-21 game.

In heartbreaking fashion, the Pirates were unable to tie the game toward the end, as kicker Adam Brown missed a 29-yard field goal that would have sent the game to overtime.

Hampton did struggle late in Saturday’s game, but with time to regroup, the Pirates should be ready to play arguably their most important game of the season. NC Central, however, has plenty of momentum heading into this Saturday after a dominating performance against Delaware State. With that being said, they’ll be confident in trying to gain MEAC supremacy over Hampton.

The Pirates will look to secure a win to stay on track of what already seems to be a promising year so far.

Marshall Movie Review

Selena Roberts | Staff Writer

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Courtesy of Dahyo Coleman

This time of year promises new films that will be sure to generate excitement from audiences everywhere. One film that is sure to get Oscar buzz is none other than Marshall. Marshall is a unique biopic that showcases the esteemed judge’s early beginnings as a young lawyer working for the NAACP. The film displays Thurgood Marshall’s career and life before his victorious win in Brown VS. Board of Education, the case responsible for desegregating schools in 1954, and his role as the first African American Supreme Court Justice.

The film stars Chadwick Boseman as Thurgood Marshall, Sterling K. Brown as Joseph Spell, Josh Gad as Sam Friedman and Kate Hudson as wealthy socialite Eleanor Strubing. The plot centers on Thurgood Marshall’s attempt to clear an innocent black man’s name, Joseph Spell, after he is accused of sexual assault and attempted murder by his white employer Eleanor Strubing. Joseph struggles to prove his innocence, but with Marshall’s guidance, he is given a fighting chance.

The movie shows a different side of Thurgood Marshall that was not often showed to the public. Viewers get to see him as someone who is righteous, but is willing to go above and beyond even if it means breaking the rules in order to get justice for those who deserve it. One poignant line that Boseman’s character stated during the film was, “I only represent innocent people, people accused because of their race…that’s my mission.”

This is not Boseman’s first time playing an influential figure on the big screen. He first starred as Jackie Robinson in 42 in 2013. He then took on the role of James Brown in Get On Up in 2014. Like his previous roles, Boseman’s role in Marshall did not disappoint.

The movie’s plot correlates with society today, as it is released during a time where many are at odds with the Trump administration. Minorities are still facing opposition from the government. Boseman spoke on how timely the film is. He stated, “It’s so unfortunate that it’s so, so relevant at this time period, but at least we have it to shed light and to give people hope, to remind people. There’s the phrase ‘Make America Great Again,’ but how did we make America great? Who did it? It was Thurgood Marshall who did it.”

Steven Tompson, a freshman political science major, said, “As someone who is aspiring to be a lawyer, I think that it is great to have a movie like this. Not only is it inspiring, but I learned more about someone I consider a hero.”