Monthly Archives: October 2017

Eminem’s the talk of the BET Hip Hop Awards

Carlie Beard | Staff Writer

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Courtesy of Carlie Beard

This year’s BET Hip Hop Awards were filled with unexpected twists and turns that kept viewers’ eyes glued to their TV screens.

DJ Khaled, one of the most respected DJs in hip-hop, hosted the show. He brought along his 11-month-old son, Asahd Khaled, who also happens to be the executive producer of his latest project, “Grateful.” Nicole Tuck, his partner and mother of his son, was also present at the awards to support Khaled.

The Miami native was excited to host the awards show because the event took place in his hometown at Fillmore Jackie Gleason Theater. DJ Khaled won the awards for MVP of the Year and also DJ of the Year.

From the cyphers to the performances, hip-hop’s greatest were in attendance, including stars such as Gucci Mane, Rick Ross, Trina, T-Pain and Yo Gotti. Some rookies were also present, such as rappers Dave East, Playboi Carti, Tee Grizzley and Cardi B. Cardi B was there to collect a plethora of awards. The “Bodak Yellow” rapper took home four awards for the night, including the award for Hustler of the Year.

Rap group Migos performed their latest single, “Too Hotty.” Cardi B, Flo Rida, Gucci Mane, Yo Gotti and others hit the stage as well.

Now to the crowd favorite: the cyphers. The cyphers this year were in groups, as usual. They featured rappers like Fat Joe, Tee Grizzley, Belly and Zoey Dollars. There was even a cypher that featured only female rappers, known as “Femcees.”

The moment that had everyone talking was Eminem’s cypher. During his cypher, Eminem called out President Donald Trump for his lack of concern when discussing issues the U.S. faces, such as gun control and Colin Kaepernick’s national anthem protest. Eminem also addressed his fans by saying, “And any fan of mine who’s a supporter of his, I’m drawing in the sand a line, [you’re] either for or against.”

Hampton senior sports management major Kris Johnson-Anderson, who is from Atlanta, offered his thoughts about Eminem.

“His performance was very relatable to what’s going on in society,” Johnson-Anderson said. “[It] brought awareness to a nonprofit organization, the NFL, and how it is constantly making money off of a controversy such as the Colin Kaepernick protest. It was significant that Eminem brought attention to immigration and health care in America.”

Johnson-Anderson added, “Although, it is important that we discuss topics [like] police brutality and racism in our country, we must also place more emphasis on what is occurring in and around our country. For example, a hurricane relief effort for Puerto Rico or the fires that are killing people and leaving some missing in California.”

Kendrick Lamar ended the awards ceremony by taking home three awards. He also won the most anticipated award for Album of the Year. Other artists nominated for the award included DJ Khaled, Future, J. Cole, and Jay-Z.

Recaps of the best moments from the show are available on BET.com.

 

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Hampton University fashion: Then and now

Destany Manns | Contributing Writer

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Trends have changed over the years, and the clothing has changed, too.

From oversized T-shirts and baggy pants to laced-up tops and skin-tight jeggings, it is obvious that what we wear today differs from what our parents wore back in the day. In the past few years, Hampton students have gained some attention when it comes to their clothing choices. Clothing trends have become more unique than ever, and some even believe these trends are borderline inappropriate.

“As a former Hampton University student, we as Hamptonians held ourselves to a higher standard,” Hampton alumna Kenya Winecoff said. “The way we carry ourselves defines our legacy. It is not that we aren’t accepting of these new trends, [but] we just believe there is a time and a place [for them].  We want that legacy to be one of class and sophistication.”

The ‘90s were all about urban style. Hampton alumni wore styles that we have recreated today. Celebrities inspired trends such as athletic jerseys, velvet sweat suits, Baby Phat tanks and that one oversized white T-shirt every guy had in his closet.

In today’s generation, Hampton students have traded in boot-cut for skinny and leather for leggings, but certain things remain the same. Aaliyah and Total pioneered the Tommy Hilfiger tube top and Calvin Klein bra-styled tops long before they became trends for young teens today. Male styles have transformed from urban to mainstream.

“Compared to the past, rich brands and are more in style now,” said Justin Whitner, a sophomore broadcast journalism major from Charlotte, N.C. “If everybody knows you have on something expensive, then you [look cool]. Long T-shirts and skinny jeans are really in now as well. Back then, it was more so baggy clothing that was popular; now everything is tight.”

For women, what’s considered “sexy” comes and goes, but women have been wearing different levels of revealing clothing forever.

“I do believe some styles for women have become more risqué over the years, but it’s all about what you wear and how you wear it,” said Asjah Wallace, a sophomore from Charlotte, N.C.

Hampton University has always been known for making fashion statements on campus. With the Homecoming weekend approaching, students have already planned their outfits for this year’s events. As Hamptonians, it’s in our blood to dress for success wherever we go. Dressing with class, style and sophistication is the signature Hamptonian stamp recognized across the country.

Although the styles may have changed, the legacy will always remain the same.

TV fans thirsty for drama turn to ABC on Thursdays

Naomi Ludlow | Arts & Entertainment Editor

TV producer Shonda Rhimes, who last week became the third black woman named to the Television Hall of Fame, is back at it again with her most anticipated “Thank God It’s Thursday” lineup yet.

The “T.G.I.T.” hit shows include “Grey’s Anatomy” (in its 14th season), “Scandal” (seventh and final season) and “How to Get Away with Murder” (fourth season). The new seasons premiered Sept. 29, so if you missed them, you still have a chance to catch up.

Channing Dungey, the entertainment president at ABC, explained to reporters at The Hollywood Reporter why Rhimes and the network decided to end the political drama “Scandal.”

Dungey noted that Rhimes – who joined Oprah Winfrey and Diahann Carroll in the Hall, according to Essence.com – had always envisioned a seven-season drama. The “Scandal” season was already planned out, but due to recent political issues, it had to be rewritten. Apparently, the show was going to relate too closely to modern reality.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, the production staff did not want the show to seem as if it was mimicking real life scenarios.

One Hampton University student responded to the series ending in an unexpected way.

“All good things come to an end, so it is better for the show to leave on high note rather than [to] have it still dragging on,” said Angelique Brown, a junior from Long Island, N.Y.

She further explained that Rhimes knows how to leave audiences wanting more instead of having people question why the show is still on.

In the interview with The Hollywood Reporter, Rhimes mentioned that she only expected “Grey’s Anatomy” to be seven seasons as well. As the show goes into its 14th season, viewers are still sitting on the edge of their seats, waiting to see more.

“It is the only show that makes me emotional,” said Amaiyah Beverly, a senior psychology major from Washington, D.C. “I really feel for the characters. I cannot wait for the next season.”

Rhimes has had a long run with the network and has created hit shows along the way. She coined her own term, “T.G.I.T.,” to promote her Thursday night shows.

It is rumored that Rhimes is going to add another show to the lineup – a Romeo and Juliet drama called “Still Star-Crossed.”

With the outcomes of her previous shows, will this show be just as successful?

It’s a mystery. But viewers can expect drama, love and even more drama from Rhimes’ current shows.

 

Republican lawmakers wave the white flag yet again on health care

Zoe Griffin | Contributing Writer

The GOP’s latest attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, has not fared well with Republican lawmakers.

The goal of Republican lawmakers was to meet the Oct. 1 deadline of passing the American Health Care Act before the current fiscal year ended, but they were unsuccessful yet again.

Now that the deadline passed, the bill can’t be passed with a simple majority.

It now requires the cooperation of the Democratic Party.

On Jan. 10, just days before President Trump’s inauguration, he told The New York Times that Republicans would have Obamacare repealed “probably sometime next week.”

Now, as October starts, Obamacare is still the law of the land, and Republicans are no closer to overhauling their health care law than they were when Trump took office.

“I try to look at both sides and kind of create a parallel between Obamacare and the GOP plan,” Hampton University sophomore journalism major Jordyn Brown said. “It’s important to be aware of the extreme differences and goals of each health care plan. These plans are both targeted to affect specific groups of people. Watching the attempts at altering health care is scary but necessary.”

Approximately 18 million Americans would be without health care coverage in the first year if the GOP Healthcare bill passed, replacing the Affordable Care Act. By the year of 2026, approximately 32 million Americans would lose health care coverage.

“We haven’t given up on changing the American health care system. We are not going to be able to do that this week, but it still lies ahead of us, and we haven’t given up on that,” Senator McConnell told CNN reporters Tuesday.

Democrats and Republicans that voted against the GOP healthcare bill can exhale and wait for the next attempts at repealing Obama Care.

“Republicans are ignoring the problems that Congress found within the bill,” second-year political science major Corei Flowers said. “The best thing for us is for both sides to throw away their pride and come up with a compromise. Republicans are never going to agree with Obamacare, and Democrats are never going to agree with the GOP bill.”

One Hampton University student was relieved when news reports revealed that the GOP bill failed.

“I feel like people don’t really understand how important Obamacare is for some people,” sophomore journalism major Brandi Hutchinson said. “There are people of all ethnicities and backgrounds [who] are only alive and well because of Obamacare. How is taking this away humane at all? I don’t understand how someone’s life and well-being can mean absolutely nothing to certain individuals.”

Lost in translation in a “united” nation

Randall Williams | Sports Editor

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ESPN

Colin Kaepernick’s name over the past year has remained a frequent subject of discussion when it comes to the NFL. His protest over the racial inequality and social injustice has heard plenty of praise but also a significant amount of disapproval as well.

The former San Francisco 49ers quarterback aimed to spread awareness of the topics by kneeling during the national anthem last season.

“Kaepernick [was] not trying to disrespect fallen soldiers that have fought to protect the country for what it is today,” Hampton University sophomore Preston Randolph said this week. “He only wants equality and fairness.”

A week after the media frenzy began, Kaepernick’s jersey sales skyrocketed to the top, making him at the time the No. 1-selling jersey in the NFL. Time passed, and talk of protesting the league until he stood began.

The ratings of NFL games dropped 8 percent in January, according to Rolling Stone magazine. Many owners across the league believed this was due to the protests started by the onetime Super Bowl quarterback.

Kaepernick was released in March, and he has yet to be signed. The word “blackball” was mentioned often. Celebrities such as rapper and producer J. Cole, Seattle Seahawks defensive end Michael Bennett and basketball Hall of Famer Charles Barkley are just a few notable names in a sea full of people who say NFL owners have ostracized Kaepernick. Others believe that since his former team has not been producing, there is no reason to sign him.

President Donald Trump in March gave his own explanation on why Kaepernick remained unsigned. Trump’s reasoning was that “NFL owners don’t want to pick him up because they don’t want to get a nasty tweet.”

Six months later, the president’s attack was more personal than ever. Trump attended an Alabama rally in support of Luther Strange on Sept. 23 and said, “Wouldn’t you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, to say, ‘Get that son of [an expletive] off the field right now. Out! He’s fired. He’s fired!’”

The comment was extremely unexpected. NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell was one of the first to respond the following day, saying, “Divisive comments like these demonstrate an unfortunate lack of respect for the NFL.” From there, an array of responses occurred from players and celebrities.

This was Saturday, though, and when Sunday came, the whole world waited to see how NFL teams would react as organizations. Division was the result. Teams kneeled together. Teams locked arms. Three teams stayed in the locker room. Some teams were split in between standing and taking a knee. Trump, however, did not back down, and instead sent another load of tweets reiterating his point that everyone should stand.

A day passed, and then the Dallas Cowboys were the center of attention. Jerry Jones, owner of “America’s Team,” was also a point of focus. This was due to his avid support of Trump over the past two years in his run as a politician, even donating $1 million. The team knelt and locked arms, all while being booed by the crowd.

People who did not agree with protests during the anthem began using the hashtag “I Stand” on social media and also discussed boycotting the NFL until the players stand. The NFL was already being boycotted by some American citizens for Kaepernick’s unemployment.

So two sides who oppose each other are now doing the same thing to try to cripple the nation’s most popular sport.

“I feel because of Trump’s comments towards the NFL [that] people are now missing the point of why the knee was taken in the first place,” Hampton student Kevin Monday said.

Has America become lost in Trump’s comments? Is the U.S. forgetting the purpose of the original protest? Although there are individual players such as Bennett, Seahawks receiver Doug Baldwin, Philadelphia Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins and more who have remained kneeling for the original cause, there is a discrepancy.

Since teams in Week 3 took a knee following Trump’s comments, the impression was conveyed that they are kneeling out of humiliation by the president.

A humiliation that was met without a response would have been an embarrassment. To avoid this, the league responded accordingly.

 

Rev. Jesse Jackson talks voter registration to Hampton community

Leenika Belfield-Martin| Lifestyle Editor

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Courtesy of Stephanie Smith

Reverend Jesse Jackson, the civil rights leader and second African-American to run for president, visited Hampton University on Sep- tember 20, 2017 at the Emancipation Oak. On that abnormally warm afternoon, about 200 Hampton students and members of the community gathered around the historical tree to hear the wise words of this icon.

Rev. Jackson’s visit to Hampton was a part of his tour of the Commonwealth of Virginia. The purpose of this “Healing and Rebuilding,” tour was to push voter registration. Rev. Jackson said, “We vote for resources. We vote for priorities.” One such priority Rev. Jackson discussed was cancer, the leading cause of death in Virginia. He spoke about the relationship cancer has with the environment and how poorer people often are the ones to suffer the most.

“Those who die the most [and] die the quickest are those who have the least amount of insurance.” Rev. Jackson said.

Rev. Jackson also spoke about the recent events in Charlottesville, Virginia, where white supremacist protesters and their adversaries battled over a statue of the Confederate General Robert E. Lee.

He claimed that the white supremacists have evolved instead of deceasing, saying, “The Klu Klux Klan used to march by night with their hoods on. Now, they march by day without any sense of shame.” The protests turned violent and a driver drove through a crowd of counter-protesters, killing counter-protester Heather Heyer. Rev. Jackson encour- aged the crowd not to forget those acts and to ght the hate by voting in November.

“They killed Heather in August,” he said. “We will remember in November.”

 

Rev. Jackson shared his experiences living in a segregated south during the Civil Rights Era. During this time he was arrested in 1960 for attempting to use a public library. The crowd recited with Rev. Jackson that “we are not going back” to those times and instead we will move “forward by hope and not backwards by fear.” Now, almost 50 years past segregation, Rev. Jackson said that we must learn to live together after surviving apart.

Accompanying Rev. Jackson on his tour was The New Virginia Majority Education Fund who helped register students at the event. This organization is “the catalytic force for the progressive transformation of Virginia through mass organizing…”according to its website. Last year, the organization had the largest voter registration campaign in the history of Virginia by successfully registering over 168,000 people.

Sauda Speede, who has been with the Education Fund for three consecutive years, said that registering to vote is the first step in making a change in your community. “There’s no point of complaining about certain things in Hampton. If you don’t like it, vote for change,” Speede said.

Speede also said that voting in Virginia should be easier and available to all, even former and current criminals.

“The length of the application is so long in detail… [When people] commit a crime [or] a felony they lose their right to vote forever until the governor actually pardons them and restores their rights.” She also compared the voting rights in Virginia to that of other states, saying “…in Maine and Vermont, [prisoners] vote while they’re locked up!”

 

Rev. Jackson reached out to the Hampton Chapter of NAACP,who then spoke to the Hampton University Youth and College Division of the NAACP to organize the appearance, according to Hampton’s Miss NAACP, Maya Young. Young, who is a senior elementary education major from South Carolina enjoyed Rev. Jackson’s message about how people fought for the right to vote.

“Like [Rev. Jackson] said, so many fought for us to have that right. So many of us today are really pushing that right without a thought. It [seems to be] no big deal to us, but they literally fought for this right.”

The North Korea problem

Jordan Benefiel | Staff Writer

North Korea needs to be stopped, and there’s no one to stop it. Tensions have been rising in the region and around the world as North Korea tests its ballistic missiles over Japan, threatens South Korea, Guam, and the U.S. Meanwhile, China does nothing.

Early in September, the Seoul military reported that North Korea was readying another ballistic missile test that could potentially be an ICBM. This news came right on the heels of North Korea’s claim that it also was testing a hydrogen bomb. Hydrogen bomb or not, Seoul’s defense ministry measured the nuclear test at 50 kilotons, making this test the DPRK’s biggest one ever.

In response to the news, the United States sent mixed messages. On the one hand, defense secretary Jim Mattis said that we are “not looking to the total annihilation” of North Korea, “but we have many options to do so.” On the other hand, United States Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley, told the security council that Kim Jong Un is “begging for war,” yet she called for more diplomacy.

Both stances were made obsolete by President Trump’s ambiguous response to a Fox News reporter. When asked if the U.S. will attack North Korea, the president responded, “We’ll see.”

With the U.S. paralyzed as to how to approach North Korea and China too indifferent to take the necessary steps to disarm the North Koreans, Americans are left vulnerable. Even if the politics of this are complicated, that should not keep the powers that be from taking the necessary steps to protecting the world from nuclear war. Thinking about how the average person is practically powerless to combat this threat, we start to realize how terrifying the world can be.

When asked if North Korean aggression scared him, Eric Harrell, a second-year psychology major at Hampton University answered, “No, the North Korean aggression doesn’t scare me.” When pressed for further elaboration, all he said is he doesn’t view the North Koreans as a threat. Another student, Harrington Gardiner, a second-year journalism major, said, “The weapons that they’re testing right now won’t be able to reach parts of our country, but they are targeting our allies as a threat [toward] us to see if we will retaliate because they want war.”

The North Korea problem continues to be prescient because the threat of nuclear war keeps escalating. Officials are afraid that if North Korea were ever capable of fitting a nuclear warhead on an ICBM, the rogue nation could cause catastrophe across the globe. Now more than ever, we need a strong unified message around how we will combat this problem.

Kardashians and Jenners keep delivering surprises

Carlie Beard | Staff Writer

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Courtesy of Carlie Beard

The baby of the Kardashian-Jenner family is having a baby?

According to a TMZ report, reality TV star Kylie Jenner is expecting a child with her
boyfriend, rapper Travis Scott. The couple has been in the spotlight for the past year on multiple occasions, from getting matching butterfly tattoos to buying each other expensive gifts.

Shortly after rumors of Jenner and rapper Tyga breaking up, she often was spotted with
Scott. The makeup guru was criticized for jumping from one relationship to the next.
Insider.com stated that Jenner is either four or five months along and that it could
possibly be a girl. Recently, though, Jenner posted a picture with her best friend, Jordyn Woods.

In the photo, Jenner was slightly showing her slim stomach, which made people question
whether or not the pregnancy reports are true.

According to OK Magazine, the couple did not plan this pregnancy, if she is, in fact,
pregnant. Many people who constantly keep up with the Kardashians know that this family is known for what some critics refer to as “publicity stunts.”

Some found it suspicious that this news went viral right before the “Keeping up with the Kardashian 10 th Anniversary Special” aired. Was this another one of famous “mom-ager” Kris Jenner’s stunts, or was it one heck of a coincidence?

When Ryan Seacrest, executive producer of KUWTK reached out to Kris Jenner to
find out if the story was true, she replied with, “Kylie’s not confirming anything.”

As if these pregnancy rumors were not shocking enough, news spread just days after
about Khloé Kardashian. It was reported by PopSugar.com that she will be expecting a child with boyfriend Tristan Thompson, a power forward for the Cleveland Cavaliers. Kardashian is divorced from former NBA player Lamar Odom.

To top it off, Kim Kardashian-West announced she and her husband of three years,
Kanye West, will be expecting a baby via surrogate. Kardashian-West has had previous issues with infertility and has even discussed the surrogate possibility on the show.

Breeon Buchanan, a Hampton University senior journalism and communications major
from Philadelphia, said the family is “doing the most,” and that it “is suspicious [that] all three pregnancies occurred around the same time.”

With three possible new additions to the family, who knows what to expect next from the
Kardashian-Jenners?

Opening Convocation: The beginning to an end

Amber Smith | Staff Writer

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Courtesy of Mary Sesay

The 75th Opening Convocation ceremony left a bittersweet feeling on the class of Ogre Phi Ogre XVI.

This annual fall ceremony for the seniors at Hampton stood as a reminder of what lies ahead.

The ceremony for Dr. William R. Harvey’s 40th year as Hampton’s president was remarkable, with words from senior class president Kris Anderson, Harvey and Calvin L. Butts, the keynote speaker and Hampton University alumnus. The inspiring words given by each speaker and the music sung by the Symphonic choir contrib- uted to the momentous celebra- tion of the hard work the seniors have accomplished thus far.
The historical tradition left many of the seniors feeling nostalgic of the start of their journey at Hampton University to now.

“Sitting there in my cap and gown, listening to the speakers made everything feel very surreal. It seems like I was a freshman just yesterday and now I’m here,” Hampton University senior Jessica Branch said.

Butts’ address delved into his time as a student at Hampton and how it impacted his life and the person he is today. Butts’ most honest advice to the seniors was about being present in communicating with others:

“The best advice I can give you is to stop communicating with your fingers.”

This statement hit home for many of the people sitting in Ogden as it was followed by a big applause from the seniors.

While it may seem like many of the graduating seniors’ time at Hampton University is slowly coming to an end, there is much more work to be done and many more memories to be made.

 

Graduation is eight months away, and although many seniors are looking forward to the momentous day, they are also determined to make the most of their nal months here.

Christopher Bates, Hampton’s Mr. Pirate and Mr. Senior, reflected on his college passage and how the gradual longing to stay is increasing.

 

“This ceremony put in per- spective that I will soon be an alumni and begin my journey in the real world,” Bates said. “[It’s] such a warm bittersweet feeling just knowing that my time at Hampton University is slowly coming to an end.”

 

NSU President set to retire

Odyssey Fields | Staff Writer

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Courtesy of Norfolk State University

After serving as Norfolk State University president for a year, Eddie N. Moore Jr. is retiring.

The university’s sixth president fulfilled the promise he made when he first took office: to clean up Norfolk State’s academic slate.

NSU had been on academic probation. Its accrediting agency, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, cited administrative shortcomings and shoddy bookkeeping when it put Norfolk State on warning in 2013 and probation a year later.

After two years of patient work by Moore and others in the administration, SACS restored Norfolk State to good standing.

Moore released his retirement statement to faculty, staff and students Sept. 25.

He previously served NSU as an interim president for three years. After signing his two-year contract, President Moore swiftly tackled the issues the university faced.

With more than 40 years of experience, Moore has conquered a variety of challenges that stood in the path of his journey at NSU.

After gaining back its accreditation, Moore worked on Norfolk’s “institutional integrity.” His three goals were improving graduation rates, increasing the amount of enrollment for students and flourishing the culture of accountability at NSU.

“NSU is a great institution that will come back greater. Whomever takes over for Mr. Moore will hopefully fulfill the legacy of NSU,” said Victoria Balogun, an NSU sophomore mass communications major.

Since 2013, the university’s rankings have greatly increased, leaving NSU ranked at No. 27 for HBCU listings. In the 2016-2017 enrollment year, admitted students increased to almost 5,000 students.

Moore also has increased funding for the Cybersecurity Workforce. On Jan. 16, 2015, Norfolk State University received a $25 million grant from U.S National Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration.

The grant allows students majoring in cybersecurity to be properly trained and help develop the university’s cybersecurity workforce. The $25 million grant was only the start to strengthening NSU’s financial support.

In July 2016, NSU received $5 million in grant money for renewable research. Leading into March of 2017, Norfolk raises an additional $1 million from the National Science Department, toward the STEM program.

A portion of the money went toward upgrading the laboratory and experiment equipment used throughout the science department. The grant also helped to support tuition for four undergraduate students attending NSU. In addition to the grant, the number of students within the STEM program increased.

“NSU will continue to prosper as a university,” NSU freshman marketing major Tatyanna Taylor said, “but President Moore will be missed.”